News Column

Study Findings from C.Y. Lu et al Broaden Understanding of Depression (Changes in antidepressant use by young people and suicidal behavior after FDA...

July 23, 2014



Study Findings from C.Y. Lu et al Broaden Understanding of Depression (Changes in antidepressant use by young people and suicidal behavior after FDA warnings and media coverage: quasi-experimental study)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators publish new report on Mental Health. According to news reporting out of Temple, Texas, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "To investigate if the widely publicized warnings in 2003 from the US Food and Drug Administration about a possible increased risk of suicidality with antidepressant use in young people were associated with changes in antidepressant use, suicide attempts, and completed suicides among young people. Quasi-experimental study assessing changes in outcomes after the warnings, controlling for pre-existing trends."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research, "Automated healthcare claims data (2000-10) derived from the virtual data warehouse of 11 health plans in the US Mental Health Research Network. Study cohorts included adolescents (around 1.1 million), young adults (around 1.4 million), and adults (around 5 million). Rates of antidepressant dispensings, psychotropic drug poisonings (a validated proxy for suicide attempts), and completed suicides. Trends in antidepressant use and poisonings changed abruptly after the warnings. In the second year after the warnings, relative changes in antidepressant use were -31.0% (95% confidence interval -33.0% to -29.0%) among adolescents, -24.3% (-25.4% to -23.2%) among young adults, and -14.5% (-16.0% to -12.9%) among adults. These reflected absolute reductions of 696, 1216, and 1621 dispensings per 100 000 people among adolescents, young adults, and adults, respectively. Simultaneously, there were significant, relative increases in psychotropic drug poisonings in adolescents (21.7%, 95% confidence interval 4.9% to 38.5%) and young adults (33.7%, 26.9% to 40.4%) but not among adults (5.2%, -6.5% to 16.9%). These reflected absolute increases of 2 and 4 poisonings per 100 000 people among adolescents and young adults, respectively (approximately 77 additional poisonings in our cohort of 2.5 million young people). Completed suicides did not change for any age group. Safety warnings about antidepressants and widespread media coverage decreased antidepressant use, and there were simultaneous increases in suicide attempts among young people."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "It is essential to monitor and reduce possible unintended consequences of FDA warnings and media reporting."

For more information on this research see: Changes in antidepressant use by young people and suicidal behavior after FDA warnings and media coverage: quasi-experimental study. BMJ-British Medical Journal, 2014;348():2-12. BMJ-British Medical Journal can be contacted at: Bmj Publishing Group, British Med Assoc House, Tavistock Square, London WC1H 9JR, England (see also Mental Health).

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting C.Y. Lu, Cent Texas Vet Hlth Care Syst Jointly Scott & Whi, Center Appl Hlth Res, Temple, TX, United States. Additional authors for this research include F. Zhang, M.D. Lakoma, J.M. Madden, D. Rusinak, R.B. Penfold, G. Simon, B.K. Ahmedani, G. Clarke, E.M. Hunkeler, B. Waitzfelder, A. Owen-Smith, M.A. Raebel, R. Rossom, K.J. Coleman, L.A. Copeland and S.B. Soumerai.

Keywords for this news article include: Antidepressants, Texas, Temple, Therapy, Psychiatry, United States, Mental Health, Suicidal Behavior, North and Central America, Government Agencies Offices and Entities

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Biotech Week


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters