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Researchers Submit Patent Application, "Cold Plasma Electroporation of Medication and Associated Methods", for Approval

July 21, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cancer Vaccine Week -- From Washington, D.C., NewsRx journalists report that a patent application by the inventors Jacofsky, Marc C. (Phoenix, AZ); Jacofsky, David J. (Peoria, AZ); Watson, Gregory A. (Sanford, FL), filed on December 31, 2013, was made available online on July 10, 2014 (see also Cold Plasma Medical Technologies, Inc.).

The patent's assignee is Cold Plasma Medical Technologies, Inc.

News editors obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "The present invention relates to devices and methods for cold plasma medical treatment, and, more particularly, to such devices and methods for cold plasma electroporation of medications and bioactive agents into cells.

"Cold plasmas (i.e., non-thermal plasmas) are produced by the delivery of pulsed high voltage signals to a suitable electrode. Cold plasma devices may take the form of a gas jet device or a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device.

"Electroporation is the process of exposing cells to electrical fields, as illustrated in FIG. 1. When a biological cell 180 is exposed to programmed electric pulses from electrodes 170, the lipid membrane of the cell can be altered and become permeable 160. The change in the cell membrane may be of a plastic (temporary) or permanent nature, and these changes are commonly referred to as reversible or irreversible permeabilization, respectively.

"One of the primary reasons to electroporate a cell, or group of cells, is to transport a molecule across the membrane that otherwise would be unable to cross this barrier, or would require cellular energy to pump/transport in the absence of applied energy. Therefore electroporation allows the cell membrane to become permeablized, and is frequently used to either insert proteins 110 into the cell membrane, introduce large 130 or small 120 molecules into the cell(s), induce cellular fusion 140, or to destroy the cell membrane 150 altogether.

"Irreversible premeabilization can permanently damage a cell and lead to apoptosis or other mechanisms of cell death. Controllable apoptosis has been used in biofouling control, debacterialization, and drug-free cancer therapies.

"Reversible electroporation is primarily used as a method of molecular delivery, transferring a wide array of molecules, such as drugs, ions, dyes, tracers, oligonucleotides, RNA, antibodies, proteins, etc., into and out of cells. There are several advantages to using electroporation-moderated molecular delivery over conventional methods. Electroporation is generally non-invasive, drug free, non-toxic and rapidly accomplished. Due to the fact that electroporation is a physical process between the supplied electric field and the cell membrane, it is less influenced by the specific cell type when compared to conventional methods.

"Electroporation is demonstrably effective in both in vivo and in vitro clinical studies and applications, and has been employed for treating various cancers including lung, skin, breast, leukemia, specific bone cancers, and for DNA vaccination."

As a supplement to the background information on this patent application, NewsRx correspondents also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent application: "An embodiment is described of a method of applying a substance to a treatment area of a patient. The method also includes applying a cold plasma from a cold plasma device to the substance for a predetermined treatment time to thereby cause electroporation of the substance into cells of the patient.

"A further embodiment is described of a method of generating a cold plasma from a cold plasma device. The method also includes passing the cold plasma from the cold plasma device via a nozzle to a treatment area of a patient for a predetermined treatment time. The nozzle includes an element (e.g., disk) positioned in the nozzle, the element (e.g., disk) including a substance. The passing of the cold plasma through the substance thereby causes electroporation of the substance into cells of the patient.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS/FIGURES

"FIG. 1 illustrates a number of applications of electroporation.

"FIG. 2 illustrates an exemplary tip assembly that includes a porous foam element, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

"FIGS. 3A and 3B illustrate different tips for use with a cold plasma generation device, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

"FIG. 4 illustrates a cannula tube embodiment that includes a porous foam element, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

"FIG. 5 illustrates a method for electroporation using a cold plasma, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

"FIG. 6 illustrates a method for electroporation using a cold plasma, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention."

For additional information on this patent application, see: Jacofsky, Marc C.; Jacofsky, David J.; Watson, Gregory A. Cold Plasma Electroporation of Medication and Associated Methods. Filed December 31, 2013 and posted July 10, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=1851&p=38&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140703.PD.&OS=PD/20140703&RS=PD/20140703

Keywords for this news article include: Technology, Cell Membrane, Cellular Structures.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Cancer Vaccine Week


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