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Researchers from University of Washington Provide Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of Essential Amino Acids (Influence of histidine...

July 24, 2014



Researchers from University of Washington Provide Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of Essential Amino Acids (Influence of histidine incorporation on buffer capacity and gene transfection efficiency of HPMA-co-oligolysine brush ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Gene Therapy Weekly -- Researchers detail new data in Essential Amino Acids. According to news reporting out of Seattle, Washington, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "One of the major intracellular barriers to nonviral gene delivery is efficient endosomal escape. The incorporation of histidine residues into polymeric constructs has been found to increase endosomal escape via the proton sponge effect."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Washington, "Statistical and diblock copolymers of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA), oligolysine, and oligohistidine were synthesized via reversible-addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and tested for in vitro transfection efficiency, buffering ability, and polyplex uptake mechanism via the use of chemical endocytic inhibitors. Interestingly, histidine-containing statistical and diblock polymers exhibited increased buffer capacity in different endosomal pH ranges. Statistical copolymers transfected better than block copolymers that contained similar amounts of histidine. In addition, only the polymer containing the highest incorporation of oligohistidine residues led to increases in transfection efficiency over the HPMA-oligolysine base polymer. Thus, for these polymer architectures, high histidine incorporation may be required for efficient endosomal escape."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Furthermore, inhibitor studies indicate that nonacidified caveolae-mediated endocytosis may be the primary route of transfection for these copolymers, suggesting that alternative approaches for increasing endosomal escape may be beneficial for enhancing transfection efficiency with these HPMA-oligolysine copolymers."

For more information on this research see: Influence of histidine incorporation on buffer capacity and gene transfection efficiency of HPMA-co-oligolysine brush polymers. Biomacromolecules, 2013;14(6):1961-70. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Biomacromolecules - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/bomaf6)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J. Shi, Dept. of Bioengineering and Molecular Engineering & Sciences Institute, University of Washington , 3720 15th Avenue NE, Box 355061, Seattle, Washington 98195, United States. Additional authors for this research include J.G. Schellinger, R.N. Johnson, J.L. Choi, B. Chou, E.L. Anghel and S.H Pun (see also Essential Amino Acids).

Keywords for this news article include: Seattle, Histidine, Washington, United States, Cyclic Amino Acids, Essential Amino Acids, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Gene Therapy Weekly


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