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Researchers from University of Melbourne Describe Findings in Prostheses (Optical Coherence Tomography-Guided Retinal Prosthesis Design: Model of...

July 23, 2014



Researchers from University of Melbourne Describe Findings in Prostheses (Optical Coherence Tomography-Guided Retinal Prosthesis Design: Model of Degenerated Retinal Curvature and Thickness for Patient-Specific Devices)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Prostheses. According to news reporting out of Melbourne, Australia, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "Retinitis pigmentosa affects over 1.5 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness. While retinal prostheses have shown some success in restoring basic levels of vision, only generic, one-size-fits-all devices are currently being implanted."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Melbourne, "In this study, we used optical coherence tomography scans of the degenerated retina from 88 patients with retinitis pigmentosa to generate models of retinal thickness and curvature for the design of customized implants. We found the average retinal thickness at the fovea to be 152.9 +/- 61.3m, increasing to a maximum retinal thickness of 250.9 +/- 57.5m at a nasal eccentricity of 5 degrees. These measures could be used to assist the development of custom-made penetrating electrodes to enhance and optimize epiretinal prostheses. From the retinal thickness measurements, we determined that the optimal length of penetrating electrodes to selectively stimulate retinal ganglion cell bodies and interneuron axons in the ganglion cell layer should be 30-100m, and to preferentially stimulate interneurons in the inner nuclear layer, electrodes should be 100-200m long. Electrodes greater than 200m long had the potential to penetrate through the retina into the choroid, which could cause devastating complications to the eye and should be avoided."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The two- and three-dimensional models of retinal thickness developed in this study can be used to design patient-specific epiretinal implants that will help with safety and to optimize the efficacy of neuronal stimulation, ensuring the best functional performance of the device for patients."

For more information on this research see: Optical Coherence Tomography-Guided Retinal Prosthesis Design: Model of Degenerated Retinal Curvature and Thickness for Patient-Specific Devices. Artificial Organs, 2014;38(6):E82-E94. Artificial Organs can be contacted at: Wiley-Blackwell, 111 River St, Hoboken 07030-5774, NJ, USA. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Artificial Organs - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1525-1594)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting N.L. Opie, University of Melbourne, Dept. of Phys, Melbourne Mat Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia. Additional authors for this research include L.N. Ayton, N.V. Apollo, K. Ganesan, R.H. Guymer and C.D. Luu (see also Prostheses).

Keywords for this news article include: Melbourne, Prostheses, Prosthetics, Medical Devices, Imaging Technology, Australia and New Zealand, Optical Coherence Tomography

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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