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Researchers from University of Manitoba Report Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of CHO Cells (The bioactivity and fractionation of...

July 23, 2014



Researchers from University of Manitoba Report Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of CHO Cells (The bioactivity and fractionation of peptide hydrolysates in cultures of CHO cells)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Research findings on CHO Cells are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting originating in Winnipeg, Canada, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Peptide hydrolysate supplements in mammalian cell cultures provide enhanced growth and productivity. The objective of this study was to compare the bioactivity of ten different commercially available hydrolysates from plant, microbial, and animal sources."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of Manitoba, "The peptide hydrolysates were tested as supplements to cultures of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that produce human beta interferon (-IFN). A soy hydrolysate was shown to support high cell growth but not protein productivity compared to an animal component hydrolysate (Primatone RL). On the other hand, a yeast hydrolysate showed lower cell growth, but comparable productivity of the recombinant protein. Glycosylation analysis showed that the glycan profile of -IFN produced in yeast hydrolysate supplemented cultures was equivalent to that from Primatone RL-supplemented cultures. Fractionation of the yeast hydrolysate and Primatone RL produced a similar protein-assayed pattern except for one extra peak at around 1 kDa in the Primatone RL profile. A fraction taken at a molecular weight range of 1.5-1.7 kDa showed the highest growth promoting activity in both samples. However, four other fractions in yeast hydrolysate and two in Primatone RL at lower molecular weights showed some growth promoting activity."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "The yeast hydrolysates provided a good alternative to the animal sourced Primatone RL for high productivity of -IFN from CHO cells with equivalent glycosylation."

For more information on this research see: The bioactivity and fractionation of peptide hydrolysates in cultures of CHO cells. Biotechnology Progress, 2014;30(3):584-593. Biotechnology Progress can be contacted at: Wiley-Blackwell, 111 River St, Hoboken 07030-5774, NJ, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Biotechnology Progress - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/bipret)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting M. Spearman, University of Manitoba, Dept. of Microbiol, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada. Additional authors for this research include C. Lodewyks, M. Richmond and M. Butler (see also CHO Cells).

Keywords for this news article include: Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, CHO Cells, Cell Line, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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