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Researchers from Federal University Provide Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of General and Comparative Endocrinology [Phenotypic...

July 22, 2014



Researchers from Federal University Provide Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of General and Comparative Endocrinology [Phenotypic characterization and in vitro propagation and transplantation of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis ...]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Life Science Research. According to news originating from Belo Horizonte, Brazil, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "In association with in vitro culture and transplantation, isolation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is an excellent approach for investigating spermatogonial physiology in vertebrates. However, in fish, the lack of SSC molecular markers represents a great limitation to identify/purify these cells, rendering it difficult to apply several valuable biotechnologies in fish-farming."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Federal University, "Herein, we describe potential molecular markers, which served to phenotypically characterize, cultivate and transplant Nile tilapia SSCs. Immunolocalization revealed that Gfra1 is expressed exclusively in single type A undifferentiated spermatogonia (Aund, presumptive SSCs). Likewise, the expression of Nanos2 protein was observed in Aund cells. However, Nanos2-positive spermatogonia have also been identified in cysts with two to eight germ cells that encompass type A differentiated spermatogonia (Adiff). Moreover, we also established effective primary culture conditions that allowed the Nile tilapia spermatogonia to expand their population for at least one month while conserving their original undifferentiated (stemness) characteristics. The maintenance of Aund spermatogonial phenotype was demonstrated by the expression of early germ cell specific markers and, more convincingly, by their ability to colonize and develop in the busulfan-treated adult Nile tilapia recipient testes after germ cell transplantation."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "In addition to advancing our knowledge on the identity and physiology of fish SSCs, these findings provide the first step in establishing a system that will allow fish SSCs expansion in vitro, representing an important progress towards the development of new biotechnologies in aquaculture, including the possibility of producing transgenic fish."

For more information on this research see: Phenotypic characterization and in vitro propagation and transplantation of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) spermatogonial stem cells. General and Comparative Endocrinology, 2013;192():95-106. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; General and Comparative Endocrinology - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/622837)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from S.M. Santos Nassif Lacerda, Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Dept. of Morphology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais 31270-901, Brazil. Additional authors for this research include G.M. Costa, M.DEA. da Silva, P.H. Campos-Junior, T.M. Segatelli, M.T. Peixoto, R.R. Resende and L.R de Franca (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Brazil, South America, Belo Horizonte, Life Science Research.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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