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Reports Outline Inflammation Study Findings from Free University (Surface modifications of silica nanoparticles are crucial for their inert versus...

July 25, 2014



Reports Outline Inflammation Study Findings from Free University (Surface modifications of silica nanoparticles are crucial for their inert versus proinflammatory and immunomodulatory properties)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Investigators publish new report on Inflammation. According to news reporting originating in Brussels, Belgium, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Silica (SiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in diverse industrial and biomedical applications. Their applicability depends on surface modifications, which can limit potential health problems."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Free University, "To assess the potential impact of SiO2 NP exposure and NPs chemical modifications in allergic airway inflammation. Mice were sensitized by five repetitive intraperitoneal injections of ovalburnin/aluminum hydroxide (1 mu g) over 42 days, then intratracheally instilled with plain or modified SiO2 NPs (50 mu g/mouse), and subsequently aerosol challenged for 20 minutes with ovalbumin. One or 5 days later, allergic inflammation was evaluated by cell differentiation of broncho-alveolar lavage fluid, lung function and gene expression and histopathology, as well as electron and confocal microscopy of pulmonary tissue. Plain SiO2 NPs induced proinflammatory and immunomodulatory effects in vivo, highlighted by enhanced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid, induction of a pulmonary T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine pattern, differentiation of type 2 macrophages, and by morphological changes in the lung of sensitized mice. These effects were dramatically attenuated using surface-functionalized NPs with amino and phosphate groups, but not with polyethylene glycol. The role of macrophages in taking up SiO2 NPs was confirmed by flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and gene expression analysis."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Our data suggest that amino and phosphate surface modifications, but not polyethylene glycol (PEG), mitigate the proinflammatory and immunomodulatory effect of SiO2 NPs in allergic airway inflammation, paving the way for new strategies in the production of nanomaterialswith lower health impact for humans."

For more information on this research see: Surface modifications of silica nanoparticles are crucial for their inert versus proinflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. International Journal of Nanomedicine, 2014;9():2815-2832. International Journal of Nanomedicine can be contacted at: Dove Medical Press Ltd, PO Box 300-008, Albany, Auckland 0752, New Zealand (see also Inflammation).

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting V. Marzaioli, Vrije Univ Brussel, Dept. of Dermatol, Brussels, Belgium. Additional authors for this research include J.A. Aguilar-Pimentel, I. Weichenmeier, G. Luxenhofer, M. Wiemann, R. Landsiedel, W. Wohlleben, S. Eiden, M. Mempel, H. Behrendt, C. Schmidt-Weber, J. Gutermuth and F. Alessandrini.

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Belgium, Brussels, Immunology, Macrophages, Inflammation, Nanoparticle, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies, Mononuclear Phagocyte System

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Health & Medicine Week


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