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Reports on Nanoparticles Findings from Michigan Technological University Provide New Insights (Peptide-Directed Self-Assembly of Functionalized...

July 22, 2014



Reports on Nanoparticles Findings from Michigan Technological University Provide New Insights (Peptide-Directed Self-Assembly of Functionalized Polymeric Nanoparticles Part I: Design and Self-Assembly of Peptide-Copolymer Conjugates into ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Data detailed on Nanoparticles have been presented. According to news reporting from Houghton, Michigan, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "A robust self-assembly of nanoparticles into fibers and 3D scaffolds is designed and fabricated by functionalizing a RAFT-polymerized amphiphilic triblock copolymer with designer ionic complementary peptides so that the assembled core-shell polymeric nanoparticles are directed by peptide assembly into continuous 'nanoparticle fibers,'' ultimately leading to 3D fiber scaffolds. The assembled nanostructure is confirmed by FESEM and optical microscopy."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Michigan Technological University, "The assembly is not hindered when a protein (insulin) is incorporated within the nanoparticles as an active ingredient. MTS cytotoxicity tests on SW-620 cell lines show that the peptides, copolymers, and peptide-copolymer conjugates are biocompatible."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "The methodology of self-assembled nanoparticle fibers and 3D scaffolds is intended to combine the advantages of a flexible hydrogel scaffold with the versatility of controlled release nanoparticles to offer unprecedented ability to incorporate desired drug(s) within a self-assembled scaffold system with individual control over the release of each drug."

For more information on this research see: Peptide-Directed Self-Assembly of Functionalized Polymeric Nanoparticles Part I: Design and Self-Assembly of Peptide-Copolymer Conjugates into Nanoparticle Fibers and 3D Scaffolds. Macromolecular Bioscience, 2014;14(6):853-871. Macromolecular Bioscience can be contacted at: Wiley-V C H Verlag Gmbh, Boschstrasse 12, D-69469 Weinheim, Germany. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Macromolecular Bioscience - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1616-5195)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting X.C. Ding, Michigan Technological University, Dept. of Chem, Houghton, MI 49931, United States. Additional authors for this research include J. Janjanam, A. Tiwari, M. Thompson and P.A. Heiden (see also Nanoparticles).

Keywords for this news article include: Houghton, Michigan, United States, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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