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Reports from Department of Agriculture Add New Data to Findings in Transcription Factors [Related to ABA-Insensitive3(ABI3)/Viviparous1 and AtABI5...

July 23, 2014



Reports from Department of Agriculture Add New Data to Findings in Transcription Factors [Related to ABA-Insensitive3(ABI3)/Viviparous1 and AtABI5 transcription factor coexpression in cotton enhances drought stress adaptation]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Fresh data on Proteins are presented in a new report. According to news reporting originating in Lubbock, Texas, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Drought tolerance is an important trait being pursued by the agbiotech industry. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a stress hormone that mediates a multitude of processes in growth and development, water use efficiency (WUE) and gene expression during seed development and in response to environmental stresses."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the Department of Agriculture, "Arabidopsis B3-domain transcription factor under bar elated to (A) under bar BA-Insensitive3 (ABI3)/(V) under bar iviparous1 (namely AtRAV2) and basic leucine zipper (bZIPs) AtABI5 or AtABF3 transactivated ABA-inducible promoter:GUS reporter expression in a maize mesophyll protoplast transient assay and showed synergies in reporter transactivation when coexpressed. Transgenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) expressing AtRAV1/2 and/or AtABI5 showed resistance to imposed drought stress under field and greenhouse conditions and exhibited improved photosynthesis and WUEs associated with absorption through larger root system and greater leaf area. We observed synergy for root biomass accumulation in the greenhouse, intrinsic WUE in the field and drought tolerance in stacked AtRAV and AtABI5 double-transgenic cotton. We assessed AtABI5 and AtRAV1/2 involvement in drought stress adaptations through reactive oxygen species scavenging and osmotic adjustment by marker gene expression in cotton. Deficit irrigation-grown AtRAV1/2 and AtABI5 transgenics had 'less-stressed' molecular and physiological phenotypes under drought, likely due to improved photoassimilation and root and shoot sink strengths and enhanced expression of endogenous GhRAV and genes for antioxidant and osmolyte biosynthesis."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Overexpression of bZIP and RAV TFs could impact sustainable cotton agriculture and potentially other crops under limited irrigation conditions."

For more information on this research see: Related to ABA-Insensitive3(ABI3)/Viviparous1 and AtABI5 transcription factor coexpression in cotton enhances drought stress adaptation. Plant Biotechnology Journal, 2014;12(5):578-589. Plant Biotechnology Journal can be contacted at: Wiley-Blackwell, 111 River St, Hoboken 07030-5774, NJ, USA. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Plant Biotechnology Journal - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-7652)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A. Mittal, ARS, Dept. of Agriculture, Plant Stress & Germplasm Lab, Lubbock, TX, United States. Additional authors for this research include S.S.L. Gampala, G.L. Ritchie, P. Payton, J.J. Burke and C.D. Rock (see also Proteins).

Keywords for this news article include: Texas, Lubbock, Proteins, United States, Transcription Factors, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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