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Recent Studies from Columbia University Add New Data to Cochlear Implants (Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy as a Novel Proximity Sensor for...

July 23, 2014



Recent Studies from Columbia University Add New Data to Cochlear Implants (Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy as a Novel Proximity Sensor for Atraumatic Cochlear Implant Insertion)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Current study results on Ear Surgery have been published. According to news reporting out of New York City, New York, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "A growing number of minimally invasive surgical and diagnostic procedures require the insertion of an optical, mechanical, or electronic device in narrow spaces inside a human body. In such procedures, precise motion control is essential to avoid damage to the patient's tissues and/or the device itself."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Columbia University, "A typical example is the insertion of a cochlear implant which should ideally be done with minimum physical contact between the moving device and the cochlear canal walls or the basilar membrane. Because optical monitoring is not possible, alternative techniques for sub millimeter-scale distance control can be very useful for such procedures. The first requirement for distance control is distance sensing. We developed a novel approach to distance sensing based on the principles of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The SECM signal, i.e., the diffusion current to a microelectrode, is very sensitive to the distance between the probe surface and any electrically insulating object present in its proximity. With several amperometric microprobes fabricated on the surface of an insertable device, one can monitor the distances between different parts of the moving implant and the surrounding tissues. Unlike typical SECM experiments, in which a disk-shaped tip approaches a relatively smooth sample, complex geometries of the mobile device and its surroundings make distance sensing challenging."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Additional issues include the possibility of electrode surface contamination in biological fluids and the requirement for a biologically compatible redox mediator."

For more information on this research see: Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy as a Novel Proximity Sensor for Atraumatic Cochlear Implant Insertion. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 2014;61(6):1822-1832. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering can be contacted at: Ieee-Inst Electrical Electronics Engineers Inc, 445 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08855-4141, USA. (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers - www.ieee.org/; IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering - ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/RecentIssue.jsp?punumber=10)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting H. Watanabe, Columbia University, Dept. of Otolaryngol, Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, United States. Additional authors for this research include J. Velmurugan, M.V. Mirkin, M.A. Svirsky, A.K. Lalwani and R.R. Llinas (see also Ear Surgery).

Keywords for this news article include: Chemistry, Ear Surgery, New York City, United States, Electrochemical, Medical Devices, Surgical Technology, Cochlear Implantation, Prosthesis Implantation, North and Central America, Otologic Surgical Procedures

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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