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Recent Research from University of Nebraska Highlight Findings in Materials Engineering (Effect of annealing on nanostructure and magnetic properties...

July 23, 2014



Recent Research from University of Nebraska Highlight Findings in Materials Engineering (Effect of annealing on nanostructure and magnetic properties of Zr2Co11 material)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Engineering -- New research on Materials Engineering is the subject of a report. According to news reporting originating from Lincoln, Nebraska, by VerticalNews correspondents, research stated, "Single-phase Zr2Co11 nanomagnetic materials with high coercivity have been fabricated by melt spinning with subsequent annealing under Ar, N-2, and vaccum. Annealing coarsens the grains and decreases the density of defects, leading to intergrain decoupling action and the enhancement of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy field of the hard magnetic phase."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the University of Nebraska, "Therefore, coercivity increases 44.7% from 6.7 kOe for the asspun to 9.7 kOe for the annealed which is the highest among Zr-Co alloys so far. The results show that the magnetic-hardening mechanism is primarily dominated by domain-wall pinning. In addition, annealing clearly increases the saturation magnetization."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The above results indicate that Zr2Co11 has potential for fabricating rare-earth-free permanent-magnet nanocomposites."

For more information on this research see: Effect of annealing on nanostructure and magnetic properties of Zr2Co11 material. Materials Science and Engineering B-Advanced Functional Solid-State Materials, 2014;186():64-67. Materials Science and Engineering B-Advanced Functional Solid-State Materials can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands.

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting W.Y. Zhang, University of Nebraska, Nebraska Center Mat & Nanosci, Lincoln, NE 68588, United States. Additional authors for this research include X.Z. Li, S. Valloppilly, R. Skomski and D.J. Sellmyer.

Keywords for this news article include: Lincoln, Nebraska, United States, Materials Engineering, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Journal of Engineering


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