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Recent Findings from Mayo Clinic Provides New Insights into Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Assessment of In Vivo Laser Ablation Using MR Elastography...

July 25, 2014



Recent Findings from Mayo Clinic Provides New Insights into Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Assessment of In Vivo Laser Ablation Using MR Elastography with an Inertial Driver)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Current study results on Medical Imaging have been published. According to news reporting originating in Rochester, Minnesota, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "To evaluate the feasibility of using MR Elastography (MRE) to monitor tissue coagulation extent during in vivo percutaneous laser ablation of the liver. A novel inertial acoustic driver was developed to apply mechanical waves via the ablation instrument."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Mayo Clinic, "Ablation testing was performed in live juvenile female pigs under anesthesia in a 1.5-T whole-body MRI scanner. The inertial driver produced suitable mechanical wave fields in the liver before, during, and after the laser ablation. During 2-min ablations using 4.5-, 7.5- and 15-W laser power, the stiffness of the lesions changed substantially in response to laser heating, indicative of protein denaturation. After a lethal thermal dose (2-min, 15-W) ablation, lesion stiffness was significantly greater than the baseline values (P < 0.007) and became stiffer over time; the mean stiffness increments from baseline were significantly greater than those after lower dose (2-min, 7.5-W) ablations (64.4% vs. 22.5%, P = 0.009). MRE was shown capable of measuring tissue stiffness changes due to in vivo laser ablation."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "If confirmed through additional studies, this technology may be useful in clinical tumor ablation to monitor the spatial extent of tissue coagulation."

For more information on this research see: Assessment of In Vivo Laser Ablation Using MR Elastography with an Inertial Driver. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 2014;72(1):59-67. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine can be contacted at: Wiley-Blackwell, 111 River St, Hoboken 07030-5774, NJ, USA. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Magnetic Resonance in Medicine - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1522-2594)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J. Chen, Mayo Clinic, Dept. of Radiol, Rochester, MN 55905, United States. Additional authors for this research include D.A. Woodrum, K.J. Glaser, M.C. Murphy, K. Gorny and R. Ehman (see also Medical Imaging).

Keywords for this news article include: Physics, Rochester, Minnesota, United States, Medical Imaging, Mechanical Waves, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Health & Medicine Week


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