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New Findings on Extracellular Matrix Proteins from Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Summarized [Biological safety of fish...

July 22, 2014



New Findings on Extracellular Matrix Proteins from Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Summarized [Biological safety of fish (tilapia) collagen]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Researchers detail new data in Proteins. According to news reporting originating from Nagasaki, Japan, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Marine collagen derived from fish scales, skin, and bone has been widely investigated for application as a scaffold and carrier due to its bioactive properties, including excellent biocompatibility, low antigenicity, and high biodegradability and cell growth potential. Fish type I collagen is an effective material as a biodegradable scaffold or spacer replicating the natural extracellular matrix, which serves to spatially organize cells, providing them with environmental signals and directing site-specific cellular regulation."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, "This study was conducted to confirm the safety of fish (tilapia) atelocollagen for use in clinical application. We performed in vitro and in vivo biological studies of medical materials to investigate the safety of fish collagen. The extract of fish collagen gel was examined to clarify its sterility. All present sterility tests concerning bacteria and viruses (including endotoxin) yielded negative results, and all evaluations of cell toxicity, sensitization, chromosomal aberrations, intracutaneous reactions, acute systemic toxicity, pyrogenic reactions, and hemolysis were negative according to the criteria of the ISO and the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The present study demonstrated that atelocollagen prepared from tilapia is a promising biomaterial for use as a scaffold in regenerative medicine."

For more information on this research see: Biological safety of fish (tilapia) collagen. Biomed Research International, 2014;2014():630757 (see also Proteins).

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting K. Yamamoto, Dept. of Cariology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki 852-8588, Japan. Additional authors for this research include K. Igawa, K. Sugimoto, Y. Yoshizawa, K. Yanagiguchi, T. Ikeda, S. Yamada and Y. Hayashi.

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Japan, Nagasaki, Collagen, Extracellular Matrix Proteins.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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