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New Findings in Physics Condensed Matter Described from Institute for Advanced Study (Water promotes the sealing of nanoscale packing defects in...

July 22, 2014



New Findings in Physics Condensed Matter Described from Institute for Advanced Study (Water promotes the sealing of nanoscale packing defects in folding proteins)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Research findings on Physics Condensed Matter are discussed in a new report. According to news originating from Basel, Switzerland, by NewsRx editors, the research stated, "A net dipole moment is shown to arise from a non-Debye component of water polarization created by nanoscale packing defects on the protein surface. Accordingly, the protein electrostatic field exerts a torque on the induced dipole, locally impeding the nucleation of ice at the protein-water interface."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Institute for Advanced Study, "We evaluate the solvent orientation steering (SOS) as the reversible work needed to align the induced dipoles with the Debye electrostatic field and computed the SOS for the variable interface of a folding protein. The minimization of the SOS is shown to drive protein folding as evidenced by the entrainment of the total free energy by the SOS energy along trajectories that approach a Debye limit state where no torque arises."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This result suggests that the minimization of anomalous water polarization at the interface promotes the sealing of packing defects, thereby maintaining structural integrity and committing the protein chain to fold."

For more information on this research see: Water promotes the sealing of nanoscale packing defects in folding proteins. Journal of Physics Condensed Matter, 2014;26(20):202101 (see also Physics Condensed Matter).

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from A. Fernandez, Instituto Argentino de Matematica, National Research Council (CONICET), Saavedra 15, Buenos Aires 1083, Argentina Collegium Basilea, Institute for Advanced Study, Hochstrasse 51, CH 4053 Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords for this news article include: Basel, Europe, Switzerland, Physics Condensed Matter.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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