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New Findings in Biological Pigments Described from School of of Life Science and Technology [Covalent attachment of Mn-porphyrin onto...

July 25, 2014



New Findings in Biological Pigments Described from School of of Life Science and Technology [Covalent attachment of Mn-porphyrin onto doxorubicin-loaded poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles for potential magnetic resonance imaging and pH-sensitive ...]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- New research on Biological Factors is the subject of a report. According to news reporting originating from Harbin, People's Republic of China, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "In this paper, theranostic nanoparticles (MnP-DOX NPs) were fabricated by conjugating Mn-porphyrin onto the surface of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticles (DOX NPs) for potential T1 magnetic resonance imaging and pH-sensitive drug delivery. An in vitro drug release study showed that the release rate of DOX from MnP-DOX NPs was slow at neutral pH but accelerated significantly in acidic conditions."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the School of Life Science and Technology, "It was found that MnP-DOX NPs could be easily internalized by HeLa cells and effectively suppressed the growth of HeLa cells and HT-29 cells due to the accelerated drug release in acidic lysosomal compartments. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning analysis demonstrated that MnP-DOX NPs had much higher longitudinal relaxivity in water (r1 value of 27.8 mM(-1) s(-1) of Mn(3+)) than Mn-porphyrin (Mn(III)TPPS3NH2; r1 value of 6.70 mM(-1) s(-1) of Mn(3+)), behaving as an excellent contrast agent for T1-weighted MRI both in vitro and in vivo."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "In summary, such a smart and promising nanoplatform integrates multiple capabilities for effective cancer diagnosis and therapy."

For more information on this research see: Covalent attachment of Mn-porphyrin onto doxorubicin-loaded poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles for potential magnetic resonance imaging and pH-sensitive drug delivery. Acta Biomaterialia, 2013;9(12):9434-41. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Acta Biomaterialia - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/702994)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting L. Jing, School of Life Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include X. Liang, X. Li, Y. Yang and Z. Dai (see also Biological Factors).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Harbin, Porphyrins, Nanoparticle, Nanotechnology, Biological Factors, Magnetic Resonance, Biological Pigments, Emerging Technologies, People's Republic of China.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Health & Medicine Week


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