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New Breast Cancer Data Have Been Reported by S. Alarifi and Co-Authors (Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Induce Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage, and Caspase...

July 22, 2014



New Breast Cancer Data Have Been Reported by S. Alarifi and Co-Authors (Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Induce Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage, and Caspase Activation in the Human Breast Cancer Cell Line)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cancer Weekly -- Research findings on Oncology are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Broad applications of iron oxide nanoparticles require an improved understanding of their potential effects on human health. In the present study, we explored the underlying mechanism through which iron oxide nanoparticles induce toxicity in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7)."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research, "MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and lactate dehydrogenase assays were used to examine mechanisms of cytotoxicity. Concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in MCF-7 cells. Iron oxide nanoparticles were found to induce oxidative stress evidenced by the elevation of reactive oxygen species generation, lipid peroxidation, and depletion of superoxide dismutase, glutathione, and catalase activities in MCF-7 cells. Nuclear staining was performed using 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), and cells were analyzed with a fluorescence microscope. Iron oxide nanoparticles (60 mu g/ml) induced substantial apoptosis that was identified by morphology, condensation, and fragmentation of the nuclei of the MCF-7 cells. It was also observed that the iron oxide NPs induced caspase-3 activity. DNA strand breakage was detected by comet assay, and it occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Thus, the data indicate that iron oxide nanoparticles induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in MCF-7 cells via oxidative stress."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "This study warrants more careful assessment of iron oxide nanoparticles before their industrial applications."

For more information on this research see: Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Induce Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage, and Caspase Activation in the Human Breast Cancer Cell Line. Biological Trace Element Research, 2014;159(1-3):416-424. Biological Trace Element Research can be contacted at: Humana Press Inc, 999 Riverview Drive Suite 208, Totowa, NJ 07512, USA. (Springer - www.springer.com; Biological Trace Element Research - www.springerlink.com/content/0163-4984/)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting S. Alarifi, King Abdul Aziz City Sci & Technol, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Additional authors for this research include D. Ali, S. Alkahtani and M.S. Alhader (see also Oncology).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Riyadh, Caspases, Oncology, Saudi Arabia, Nanoparticle, Breast Cancer, Nanotechnology, Women's Health, Peptide Hydrolases, Emerging Technologies, Enzymes and Coenzymes, Cysteine Endopeptidases

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Cancer Weekly


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