News Column

Investigators at University of California Have Reported New Data on Molecular Pharmaceutics (Distinguishing between the permeability relationships...

July 23, 2014



Investigators at University of California Have Reported New Data on Molecular Pharmaceutics (Distinguishing between the permeability relationships with absorption and metabolism to improve BCS and BDDCS predictions in early drug discovery)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Current study results on Biotechnology have been published. According to news reporting out of San Francisco, California, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "The biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) and biopharmaceutics drug distribution classification system (BDDCS) are complementary classification systems that can improve, simplify, and accelerate drug discovery, development, and regulatory processes. Drug permeability has been widely accepted as a screening tool for determining intestinal absorption via the BCS during the drug development and regulatory approval processes."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of California, "Currently, predicting clinically significant drug interactions during drug development is a known challenge for industry and regulatory agencies. The BDDCS, a modification of BCS that utilizes drug metabolism instead of intestinal permeability, predicts drug disposition and potential drug-drug interactions in the intestine, the liver, and most recently the brain. Although correlations between BCS and BDDCS have been observed with drug permeability rates, discrepancies have been noted in drug classifications between the two systems utilizing different permeability models, which are accepted as surrogate models for demonstrating human intestinal permeability by the FDA. Here, we recommend the most applicable permeability models for improving the prediction of BCS and BDDCS classifications. We demonstrate that the passive transcellular permeability rate, characterized by means of permeability models that are deficient in transporter expression and paracellular junctions (e.g., PAMPA and Caco-2), will most accurately predict BDDCS metabolism. These systems will inaccurately predict BCS classifications for drugs that particularly are substrates of highly expressed intestinal transporters."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Moreover, in this latter case, a system more representative of complete human intestinal permeability is needed to accurately predict BCS absorption."

For more information on this research see: Distinguishing between the permeability relationships with absorption and metabolism to improve BCS and BDDCS predictions in early drug discovery. Molecular Pharmaceutics, 2014;11(4):1335-44. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Molecular Pharmaceutics - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/mpohbp)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting C.A. Larregieu, Dept. of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California-San Francisco , San Francisco, California 94143-0912, United States (see also Biotechnology).

Keywords for this news article include: Biotechnology, California, San Francisco, United States, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Biotech Week


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters