News Column

STEVIA CORP - 10-K - MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

July 15, 2014

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Forward looking statements are statements not based on historical information and which relate to future operations, strategies, financial results or other developments. Forward-looking statements are based upon estimates, forecasts, and assumptions that are inherently subject to significant business, economic and competitive uncertainties and contingencies, many of which are beyond our control and many of which, with respect to future business decisions, are subject to change. These uncertainties and contingencies can affect actual results and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements made by us, or on our behalf. We disclaim any obligation to update forward-looking statements.

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Overview

We were incorporated on May 21, 2007 in the State of Nevada under the name Interpro Management Corp. On March 4, 2011, we changed our name to Stevia Corp. and effectuated a 35 for 1 forward stock split of all of our issued and outstanding shares of common stock. Effective November 15, 2013, we filed a Certificate of Amendment to the Company's Articles of Incorporation to increase the total number of authorized shares of Common Stock from one hundred million (100,000,000) shares of Common Stock to two hundred fifty million (250,000,000) shares of Common Stock, each with a par value of $0.001.

We generated revenues during the 2013 fiscal year. We expect our primary sources of revenue will be (i) providing farm management services, which will provide protocols and other services to agriculture, aquaculture, and livestock operators, (ii) the sale of inputs such as fertilizer and feed additives to agriculture, aquaculture and livestock operators, (iii) the sale of crops and seafood produced under contract farming, (iv) the sale of products derived from the stevia plant and other agriculture crops, (v) providing extraction and refining technology services related to stevia and other medicinal herbs and (v) the sale of branded consumer products made from natural ingredients.

During 2012, we completed our first commercial trials of stevia production in Vietnam. In connection with such production we have entered into supply agreements for the off-take of the stevia we produce and entered into an agreement with Growers Synergy Pte Ltd to assist in the management of our Asia day-to-day operations. We have also developed commercial applications of stevia derived products and have developed and acquired certain proprietary technology relating to stevia development which we can integrate into our own stevia production and our farm management services. In connection with our intellectual property development efforts we have engaged TechNew Technology Limited ("TechNew), as our technology partner in Vietnam and on July 5, 2012 we entered into a Cooperative Agreement (the "Cooperative Agreement") through our subsidiary Stevia Asia Limited ("Stevia Asia"), with Technew and Zhang Ji, a Chinese citizen (together with Technew, the "Partners") pursuant to which Stevia Asia and Partners have agreed to engage in a joint venture to develop certain intellectual property related to stevia development, such joint venture to be owned 70% by Stevia Asia and 30% by Technew (the "Joint Venture"). Pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement Stevia Asia agreed to contribute $200,000 per month, up to a total of $2,000,000 in financing, subject to the performance of the Joint Venture and Stevia Asia's financial capabilities.

We have also continued to establish research and production relationships with local institutions and companies in Vietnam. In April, 2012 we announced plans to begin field trials in Indonesia.

On March 19, 2012, we formed a wholly-owned subsidiary, Stevia Asia Limited, a company incorporated under the companies ordinance of Hong Kong ("Stevia Asia") that will allow the Company to expand its China operations. Hero Tact Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Stevia Asia, was incorporated under the companies ordinance of Hong Kong and renamed Stevia Technew Limited on April 28, 2012.

On October 1, 2013, we formed SC Brands Pte. Ltd., a Singapore corporation and a subsidiary in which we own a 70% equity interest, SC Brands will allow us to develop branded consumer products.

On February 24, 2014, we formed Real Hemp LLC, a wholly owned Indiana limited liability company that will focus on developing hemp products to be sold in the US. Real Hemp will work with our China partner to source hemp products from China and will focus on developing distribution channels in the US to serve commercial food and fiber buyers as well as develop online marketing channels such as Amazon.com to serve retail consumers.

Results of Operations

Our operations to-date have primarily consisted of securing purchase and supply contracts, office space and a research center, developing relationships with potential partners, and developing products derived from the stevia plant. We have earned nominal revenues since inception.

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Our auditors have issued a going concern opinion. This means that there is substantial doubt that we can continue as an on-going business for the next twelve months unless we obtain additional capital.

The following discussion of the financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, and changes in our financial position should be read in conjunction with our audited consolidated financial statements and notes included herein. Such financial statements have been prepared in conformity with U.S. GAAP and are stated in United States dollars.

Financial Condition as of March 31, 2014

We reported total current assets of $2,908,132 at March 31, 2014 consisting of cash of $735,044, accounts receivable of $673,039, prepaid fertilizer of $1,498,008 and other current assets of $2,041. Total current liabilities reported of $1,356,233 included accounts payable of $540,144 and convertible notes payable of $455,761. We had a working capital surplus of $1,551,899 at March 31, 2014.

Stockholders' Equity/Deficiency went from equity of $250,607 at March 31, 2013 to a deficiency of $806,272 at March 31, 2014. This change is due primarily to an increase in additional paid in capital from $4,760,624 as of March 31, 2013 to $11,383,415 as of March 31, 2014.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

As of March 31, 2014, we had cash of $735,044. We anticipate that a substantial amount of cash will be used as working capital and to execute our strategy and business plan. As such, we further anticipate that we will have to raise additional capital through debt or equity financings to fund our operations during the next 6 to 12 months.

Results of Operations for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2014

For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, we incurred a net loss of $9,238,526.

Revenues

Our revenues during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 totaled $6,373,199, compared to $2,168,093 in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013. The increase in revenue was the result of increased sales of farm produce.

Cost of Revenues

Cost of revenues during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 totaled $5,682,016, compared to $2,617,381 during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013. The largest component of our cost of revenues is farm produce, which was $5,118,943.

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Gross Margin

Gross margin for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 was $691,183, compared to a negative $449,288 for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013. The improved gross margin was attributable to a decrease in cost of farm produce as a percentage of revenues.

General and Administrative Expenses, Salary and Compensation and Directors' and Professional Fees

General and administration expenses for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, amounted to $490,361 compared to $412,409 in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013. Salary and compensation expenses amounted to $813,460, directors' fees amounted to $218,750 and professional fees amounted to $1,132,151 in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014.

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Results of Operations for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2013

For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, we incurred a net loss of $2,035,864.

General and administration expenses for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, amounted to $412,409 compared to $113,742 in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2012. Salary and compensation expenses amounted to $190,549, directors' fees amounted to $375,000 and professional fees amounted to $454,958 in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

As at March 31, 2014 we have $735,044 in cash and $1,356,233 in current liabilities. As at March 31, 2014, our total assets were $4,389,686 and our total liabilities were $6,747,857. We had a working capital surplus of $1,551,899 at March 31, 2014.

On August 1, 2012, we entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement with certain accredited investors (the "Financing Stockholders") to raise $500,000 in a private placement financing (the "Offering"). On August 6, 2012, after the satisfaction of certain closing conditions, the Offering closed and the Company issued to the Financing Stockholders: (i) an aggregate of 1,066,667 shares of the Company's common stock at a price per share of $0.46875 and (ii) warrants to purchase an equal number of shares of the Company's common stock at an exercise price of $0.6405 with a term of five (5) years, for gross proceeds of $500,000. Garden State Securities, Inc. ("GSS") served as the placement agent for such equity financing. Per the engagement agreement signed between GSS and the Company on June 18, 2012, in consideration for services rendered as the placement agent, the Company agreed to: (i) pay GSS cash commissions equal to $40,000, or 8.0% of the gross proceeds received in the equity financing, and (ii) issue to GSS or its designee, a warrant to purchase up to 85,333 shares of the Company's common stock representing 8% of the Shares sold in the Offering) with an exercise price of $0.6405 per share and a term of five (5) years. Pursuant to the anti-dilution adjustment provision included in the Offering, the total share amount under the Cranshire Warrant has been increased to 2,036,381 and the exercise price has been reduced to $0.0671 as a result of certain other offerings of the Company. We may receive gross proceeds of up to $136,640.40 upon the cash exercise of the Cranshire Warrants. Any such proceeds we receive will be used for working capital and general corporate matters.

On February 26, 2013, the Company issued a convertible note in the principal amount of $100,000, convertible at $0.25 per share, with interest at 12% per annum due on September 30, 2013. The convertible note is currently past due with no penalty and the Company continues to accrue the interest at 12% per annum.

On May 3, 2013, in consideration for the immediate cash exercise of outstanding warrants to purchase 853,333 shares of common stock of the Company at a price per share of $0.20, the Company issued the Anson Warrants. The warrant to purchase 1,877,333 shares of common stock is subject to a right of repurchase by the Company upon the satisfaction of certain conditions, at a price of $0.001 per warrant share. The warrant to purchase 2,346,666 shares is only exercisable upon the investor's exercise in full of the warrant to purchase 1,877,333 shares. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of those shares of common stock. We may, however, receive gross proceeds of up to $1,228,799.60 upon the cash exercise of the Anson Warrants. Any such proceeds we receive will be used for working capital and general corporate matters.

On July 16, 2013, the Company entered into a $400,000 Promissory Note (the "June 2013 Note") with an accredited investor (the "Investor") whereby the Investor agreed to loan to the Company up to $400,000 pursuant to the terms of the June 2013 Note. The June 2013 Note provides for the first $100,000 to be advanced upon closing and additional amounts will be advanced at the Investor's sole discretion. Each advance is subject to a 10% original issue discount, such that the total amount which may actually be received by the Company pursuant to the June 2013 Note is only $360,000. The maturity date for each advance

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made under the June 2013 Note is one year from the date of such advance. If the Company repays the June 2013 Note on or before 90 days from the effective date, the interest rate shall be 0%, otherwise a one-time interest charge of l2% shall be applied to the principal sum. The June 2013 Notes are convertible into common stock of the Company on a cashless basis at any time, at a conversion price equal to the lesser of $0.26 or 65% of the lowest trade price in the 25 trading days prior to the conversion. If the conversion shares are not deliverable by DWAC an additional 10% discount will apply, and if the shares are ineligible for deposit into the DTC system and only eligible for Xclearing deposit an additional 5% discount will apply. So long as the June 2013 Note is outstanding, upon any issuance by the Company or any of its subsidiaries of any security with any term more favorable to the holder of such security or with a term in favor of the holder of such security that was not similarly provided to the Investor in the June 2013 Note, then the Company shall notify the Investor of such additional or more favorable term and such term, at the Investor's option, shall become a part of the transaction documents with the Company.

On August 22, 2013, we issued a convertible promissory note to Asher Enterprises, Inc. in the principal amount of $153,500 (the "Asher Note"), pursuant to the terms of a Securities Purchase Agreement. The Note matures on May 26, 2014, incurs interest at the rate of 8% per annum, and is convertible into shares of our common stock at a 35% discount to the average of the lowest three trading prices for our common stock during the 30 day trading period prior to the conversion date.

On March 7, 2012, the Company issued a convertible note in the principal amount of $200,000 with interest at 10% per annum due one (1) year from the date of issuance with the conversion price to be the same as the next private placement price on a per share basis, provided that the Company completes a private placement with gross proceeds of at least $100,000. On March 15, 2013, the above note was cancelled and reissued with a new convertible note consisting of the prior principal amount and the entire accrued unpaid interest for the total amount of $220,438 with interest at 12% per annum convertible at $0.25 per share due on September 30, 2013. The note is currently past due with no penalty and the Company continues to accrue the interest at 10% per annum.

On September 26, 2013, we issued a convertible note in the principal amount of $27,778 with a 10% original issuance discount and a one-time interest charge of 12%. The note is due one (1) year from the date of issuance with the conversion price at 65% of the lowest trade price for the 25 trade day period before the conversion date.

On October 15, 2013, we issued a Convertible Debenture in the principal amount of $58,000 (the "Debenture"), to Black Mountain Equities, Inc. ("Black Mountain"). On March 31, 2014, the Debenture was converted in full into 1,119,299 shares of common stock. The Debenture provides that on the next registration statement the Company files, the Company will include the shares issuable upon conversion of the Debenture. Black Mountain also received a warrant to purchase 1,000,000 shares of our common stock with an exercise price of $0.25 per share, subject to adjustment, and a term of five years.

On November 21, 2013, we issued a convertible note in the principal amount of $53,000, convertible at 65% of the three lowest bids for 30 trading days before the conversion date with interest at 8% per annum, due on August 25, 2014.

On December 9, 2013, we issued a convertible note in the principal amount of $55,556 with a 10% original issuance discount and 12% one time interest. The note is due one (1) year from the date of issuance with the conversion price at 65% of the lowest trade price for the 25 trade day period before the conversion date.

On February 7, 2014, we issued a Convertible Debenture to an investor in the principal amount of $80,000. The Convertible Debenture matures on February 6, 2015, incurs interest at the rate of 8% per annum, and is convertible into shares of our common stock at a conversion price of $0.10 per share.

On February 20, 2014 we issued a convertible note in the principal amount of $55,556 with a 10% Original Issuance Discount ("OID") and 12% one time interest. The note is due February 20, 2015, one (1) year from the date of issuance, convertible at 65% of the lowest trade price for the 25 trade day period before the conversion date.

On March 3, 2014, the Company entered into a securities purchase agreement (the "Purchase Agreement") with Nomis Bay Ltd., a Bermuda company ("Nomis Bay"). The Purchase Agreement provides that, upon the terms and subject to the conditions set forth therein, (i) Nomis Bay shall purchase from the Company on the Closing Date a senior convertible note with an initial principal amount of $500,000 (the "Initial Convertible Note") for a purchase price of $340,000 (a 32% original issue discount) and (ii) the Company shall have the right to require Nomis Bay to purchase from the Company on or prior to the 10th trading day after the effective date of the registration statement registering the shares issuable upon conversion of the Initial Convertible Note an additional senior convertible note with an initial principal amount of $600,000 (the "Additional Convertible Note" and, together with the Initial Convertible Note, the "Convertible Notes") for a purchase price of $600,000. On May 16, 2014, the Company issued the Additional Convertible Note to Nomis Bay pursuant to the Purchase Agreement. The Initial Convertible Note matures on December 27, 2014 (subject to extension as provided in the Initial Convertible Note) and, in addition to the 32% original issue discount, accrues interest at the rate of 8% per annum. The Additional Convertible Note matures on March 16, 2015 (subject to extension as provided in the Initial Convertible Note) and accrues interest at the rate of 8% per annum. The Initial Convertible Note is convertible at any time, in whole or in

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part, at Nomis Bay's option into shares of the Company's common stock, par value $0.001 per share (the "Common Stock"), at a conversion price equal to the lesser of (i) the product of (x) the arithmetic average of the lowest three (3) volume weighted average prices of the Common Stock during the 10 consecutive trading days ending and including the trading day immediately preceding the applicable conversion date and (y) 40% (the "Variable Conversion Price"), and (ii) $0.30 (as adjusted for stock splits, stock dividends, stock combinations or other similar transactions). The Additional Convertible Note is convertible at any time, in whole or in part, at Nomis Bay's option into shares of Common Stock at a conversion price that will be equal to the lesser of (i) the Variable Conversion Price and (ii) $0.30 (as adjusted for stock splits, stock dividends, stock combinations or other similar transactions). At no time will Nomis Bay be entitled to convert any portion of the Convertible Notes to the extent that after such conversion, Nomis Bay (together with its affiliates) would beneficially own more than 4.99% of the outstanding shares of Common Stock as of such date. The Company has the right at any time to redeem all, but not less than all, of the total outstanding amount then remaining under the Initial Convertible Note and/or the Additional Convertible Note in cash at a price equal to 140% of the total amount of such Convertible Note then outstanding.

Subsequent to the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, on April 8, 2014, the Company entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement (the "SPA") with an investor to raise $225,000 in a private placement financing. Pursuant to the SPA, the Company issued to the investor: (i) an aggregate of 1,500,000 shares of the Company's common stock at $0.15 per share and (ii) warrants to purchase 4,000,000 shares of the Company's common stock at an exercise price of $0.45 expiring five (5) years from the date of issuance for a gross proceeds of $225,000.

During the year ended March 31, 2014, we funded our operations from the proceeds of private sales of equity and convertible notes, proceeds from the exercise of warrants, and operating revenues. During the year ended March 31, 2014, we generated revenues of $6,373,199, we received an aggregate of $901,500 from the issuance of convertible promissory notes, and we received an aggregate of $454,174 upon the exercise of warrants to purchase our common stock. Subsequent to the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, as of July 11, 2014, investors had exercised warrants to purchase a total of 10,151,294 shares of the Company's common stock with an exercise price range from $0.0402 to 0.053365 per share for $529,490 in cash.

During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, an aggregate of $855,944 of outstanding indebtedness was converted into shares of our common stock. As of March 31, 2014, convertible promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $848,994 remained outstanding. Subsequent to the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, as of July 11, 2014, convertible note holders converted a total of $583,127, at conversion price range from $0.0390 to 0.0879 per share to 12,151,771 shares of the Company's common stock.

We do not expect that our revenues from operations will be wholly sufficient to fund our operating plan, so we are currently seeking further financing and we believe that, along with our revenues, will provide sufficient working capital to fund our operations for at least the next six months. Changes in our operating plans, increased expenses, acquisitions, or other events, may cause us to seek additional equity or debt financing in the future.

Our current cash requirements are significant due to the planned development and expansion of our business. The successful implementation of our business plan is dependent upon our ability to develop valuable intellectual property relating to stevia through our research programs, as well as our ability to develop and manage our own crop and aquaculture production operations. These planned research and agricultural development activities require significant cash expenditures. We do not expect to generate the necessary cash from our operations during the next 6 to 12 months to expand our business as desired. As such, in order to fund our operations during the next 6 to 12 months, we anticipate that we will have to raise additional capital through debt and/or equity financings, which may result in substantial dilution to our existing stockholders. There are no assurances that we will be able to raise the required working capital on terms favorable, or that such working capital will be available on any terms when needed. In addition, the terms of the Securities Purchase Agreement contain certain restrictions on our ability to engage in financing transactions. Specifically, for a period of two years after the effective date of the Securities Purchase Agreement, the Securities Purchase Agreement contains restrictions on certain types of financing transactions. The Securities Purchase Agreement contains carveouts to such financing restrictions for certain exempted transactions including (i) issuances pursuant to a stock option plan, (ii) securities issued upon the conversion of outstanding securities, (iii) securities issued pursuant to acquisitions or other strategic transactions, (iv) up to $500,000 in stock and warrants on the same terms as set forth in the Securities Purchase Agreement, and (v) up to $3,000,000 of the Company's securities.

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Contractual Obligations and Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

As of March 31, 2014, the end of our latest fiscal year, we did not have any long-term debt or purchase obligations.

We have not entered into any other financial guarantees or other commitments to guarantee the payment obligations of any third parties. We have not entered into any derivative contracts that are indexed to our shares and classified as stockholder's equity or that are not reflected in our consolidated financial statements. Furthermore, we do not have any retained or contingent interest in assets transferred to an unconsolidated entity that serves as credit, liquidity or market risk support to such entity. We do not have any variable interest in any unconsolidated entity that provides financing, liquidity, market risk or credit support to us or engages in leasing, hedging or research and development services with us.

Critical Accounting Estimates

The Management of the Company is responsible for the selection and use of appropriate accounting policies and the appropriateness of accounting policies and their application. Critical accounting policies and practices are those that are both most important to the portrayal of the Company's financial condition and results and require management's most difficult, subjective, or complex judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effects of matters that are inherently uncertain. The Company's significant and critical accounting policies and practices are disclosed below as required by generally accepted accounting principles.

Basis of Presentation

The Company's consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America ("U.S. GAAP").

Use of Estimates and Assumptions and Critical Accounting Estimates and Assumptions

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date(s) of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period(s).

Critical accounting estimates are estimates for which (a) the nature of the estimate is material due to the levels of subjectivity and judgment necessary to account for highly uncertain matters or the susceptibility of such matters to change and (b) the impact of the estimate on financial condition or operating performance is material. The Company's critical accounting estimates and assumptions affecting the financial statements were:

(i) Assumption as a going concern: Management assumes that the Company will

continue as a going concern, which contemplates continuity of operations, realization of assets, and liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business.



(ii) Allowance for doubtful accounts: Management's estimate of the allowance for

doubtful accounts is based on historical sales, historical loss levels, and an analysis of the collectability of individual accounts; and general economic conditions that may affect a client's ability to pay. The Company evaluated the key factors and assumptions used to develop the allowance in determining that it is reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole.



(iii) Fair value of long-lived assets: Fair value is generally determined using

the asset's expected future discounted cash flows or market value, if readily determinable. If long-lived assets are determined to be recoverable, but the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives are shorter than originally estimated, the net book values of the long-lived assets are depreciated over the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives. The Company considers the following to be some examples of important indicators that may trigger an impairment review: (i) significant under-performance or losses of assets relative to expected historical or projected future operating results; (ii) significant changes in the manner or use of assets or in the Company's overall strategy with respect to the manner or use of the acquired assets or changes in the Company's overall business strategy; (iii) significant negative industry or economic trends; (iv) increased competitive pressures; (v) a significant decline in the Company's stock price for a sustained period of time; and (vi) regulatory changes. The Company evaluates acquired assets for potential impairment indicators at least annually and more frequently upon the occurrence of such events.



(iv) Valuation allowance for deferred tax assets: Management assumes that the

realization of the Company's net deferred tax assets resulting from its net operating loss ("NOL") carry-forwards for Federal income tax purposes that may be offset against future taxable income was not considered more likely than not and accordingly, the potential tax benefits of the net loss carry-forwards are offset by a full valuation allowance. Management made this assumption based on (a) the Company has incurred recurring losses, (b) general economic conditions, and (c) its ability to raise additional funds to support its daily operations by way of a public or private offering, among other factors.



(v) Estimates and assumptions used in valuation of equity instruments:

Management estimates expected term of share options and similar instruments, expected volatility of the Company's common shares and the method used to estimate it, expected annual rate of quarterly dividends, and risk free rate(s) to value share options and similar instruments.



These significant accounting estimates or assumptions bear the risk of change due to the fact that there are uncertainties attached to these estimates or assumptions, and certain estimates or assumptions are difficult to measure or value.

Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various assumptions that are believed to be reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources.

Management regularly evaluates the key factors and assumptions used to develop the estimates utilizing currently available information, changes in facts and circumstances, historical experience and reasonable assumptions. After such evaluations, if deemed appropriate, those estimates are adjusted accordingly.

Actual results could differ from those estimates.

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Principles of Consolidation

The Company applies the guidance of Topic 810 "Consolidation" of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to determine whether and how to consolidate another entity. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 810-10-15-10 all majority-owned subsidiaries-all entities in which a parent has a controlling financial interest-shall be consolidated except (1) when control does not rest with the parent, the majority owner; (2) if the parent is a broker-dealer within the scope of Topic 940 and control is likely to be temporary; (3) consolidation by an investment company within the scope of Topic 946 of a non-investment-company investee. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 810-10-15-8 the usual condition for a controlling financial interest is ownership of a majority voting interest, and, therefore, as a general rule ownership by one reporting entity, directly or indirectly, of more than 50 percent of the outstanding voting shares of another entity is a condition pointing toward consolidation. The power to control may also exist with a lesser percentage of ownership, for example, by contract, lease, agreement with other stockholders, or by court decree. The Company consolidates all less-than-majority-owned subsidiaries, if any, in which the parent's power to control exists.

The Company's consolidated subsidiaries and/or entities are as follows:

Date of Name of State or other incorporation or consolidated jurisdiction of formation (date subsidiary or incorporation or of acquisition, entity organization if applicable) Attributable interest Stevia Ventures International The Territory of the Ltd. British Virgin Islands April 11, 2011 100% Stevia Asia Limited Hong Kong SAR March 19, 2012 100% Stevia Technew Limited Hong Kong SAR April 28, 2012 70% SC Brands Pte Ltd Singapore October 1, 2013 February 24, Real Hemp, LLC State of Indiana 2014



The consolidated financial statements include all accounts of the Company and the consolidated subsidiaries and/or entities as of reporting period ending date(s) and for the reporting period(s) then ended.

All inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated.

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Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The Company follows paragraph 820-10-35-37 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification ("Paragraph 820-10-35-37") to measure the fair value of its financial instruments and paragraph 825-10-50-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for disclosures about fair value of its financial instruments. Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a framework for measuring fair value in accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (U.S. GAAP), and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. To increase consistency and comparability in fair value measurements and related disclosures, Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value into three (3) broad levels. The three (3) levels of fair value hierarchy defined by Paragraph 820-10-35-37 are described below:

Level 1 Quoted market prices available in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reporting date. Level 2 Pricing inputs other than quoted prices in active markets included in Level 1, which are either directly or indirectly observable as of the reporting date. Level 3 Pricing inputs that are generally observable inputs and not corroborated by market data.



Financial assets are considered Level 3 when their fair values are determined using pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar techniques and at least one significant model assumption or input is unobservable.

The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. If the inputs used to measure the financial assets and liabilities fall within more than one level described above, the categorization is based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement of the instrument.

The carrying amounts of the Company's financial assets and liabilities, such as cash, accounts receivable, prepayments and other current assets, accounts payable, accrued expenses, and accrued interest, approximate their fair values because of the short maturity of these instruments.

The Company's convertible notes payable approximates the fair value of such instrument based upon management's best estimate of interest rates that would be available to the Company for similar financial arrangements at March 31, 2014 and 2013.

The Company's Level 3 financial liabilities consist of the derivative warrants for which there is no current market for these securities such that the determination of fair value requires significant judgment or estimation and the derivative liability on the conversion feature of the convertible notes payable. The Company valued the automatic conditional conversion, re-pricing/down-round, change of control; default and follow-on offering provisions using a lattice model, with the assistance of a third party valuation specialist, for which management understands the methodologies. These models incorporate transaction details such as Company stock price, contractual terms, maturity, risk free rates, as well as assumptions about future financings, volatility, and holder behavior as of the date of issuance and each balance sheet date.

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Fair Value of Financial Assets and Liabilities Measured on a Recurring Basis

Level 3 Financial Liabilities - Derivative Warrant Liabilities and Derivative Liability on Conversion Feature

The Company uses Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy to measure the fair value of the derivative liabilities and revalues its derivative warrant liability and derivative liability on the conversion feature at every reporting period and recognizes gains or losses in the consolidated statements of operations that are attributable to the change in the fair value of the derivative liabilities.

Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

Accounts receivable are recorded at the invoiced amount, net of an allowance for doubtful accounts. The Company follows paragraph 310-10-50-9 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to estimate the allowance for doubtful accounts. The Company performs on-going credit evaluations of its customers and adjusts credit limits based upon payment history and the customer's current credit worthiness, as determined by the review of their current credit information; and determines the allowance for doubtful accounts based on historical write-off experience, customer specific facts and economic conditions.

Pursuant to paragraph 310-10-50-2 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification account balances are charged off against the allowance after all means of collection have been exhausted and the potential for recovery is considered remote. The Company has adopted paragraph 310-10-50-6 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification and determine when receivables are past due or delinquent based on how recently payments have been received.

Outstanding account balances are reviewed individually for collectability. The allowance for doubtful accounts is the Company's best estimate of the amount of probable credit losses in the Company's existing accounts receivable. Bad debt expense is included in general and administrative expenses, if any.

There was no allowance for doubtful accounts as March 31, 2014 or 2013.

The Company does not have any off-balance-sheet credit exposure to its customers.

Carrying Value, Recoverability and Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

The Company has adopted paragraph 360-10-35-17 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for its long-lived assets. The Company's long-lived assets, which include property and equipment, acquired technology, and website development costs are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable.

The Company assesses the recoverability of its long-lived assets by comparing the projected undiscounted net cash flows associated with the related long-lived asset or group of long-lived assets over their remaining estimated useful lives against their respective carrying amounts. Impairment, if any, is based on the excess of the carrying amount over the fair value of those assets. Fair value is generally determined using the asset's expected future discounted cash flows or market value, if readily determinable. If long-lived assets are determined to be recoverable, but the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives are shorter than originally estimated, the net book values of the long-lived assets are depreciated over the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives.

The Company considers the following to be some examples of important indicators that may trigger an impairment review: (i) significant under-performance or losses of assets relative to expected historical or projected future operating results; (ii) significant changes in the manner or use of assets or in the Company's overall strategy with respect to the manner or use of the acquired assets or changes in the Company's overall business strategy; (iii) significant negative industry or economic trends; (iv) increased competitive pressures; (v) a significant decline in the Company's stock price for a sustained period of time; and (vi) regulatory changes. The Company evaluates acquired assets for potential impairment indicators at least annually and more frequently upon the occurrence of such events.

The key assumptions used in management's estimates of projected cash flow deal largely with forecasts of sales levels and gross margins. These forecasts are typically based on historical trends and take into account recent developments as well as management's plans and intentions. Other factors, such as increased competition or a decrease in the desirability of the Company's products or services, could lead to lower projected sales levels, which would adversely impact cash flows. A significant change in cash flows in the future could result in an impairment of long lived assets.

The impairment charges, if any, is included in operating expenses in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations.

Cash Equivalents

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with maturities of three months or less at the time of purchase to be cash equivalents.

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Property and Equipment

Property and equipment is recorded at cost. Expenditures for major additions and betterments are capitalized. Maintenance and repairs are charged to operations as incurred. Depreciation of furniture and fixture is computed by the straight-line method (after taking into account their respective estimated residual values) over the assets estimated useful life of five (5) years. Upon sale or retirement of property and equipment, the related cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts and any gain or loss is reflected in the statements of operations.

Intangible Assets Other Than Goodwill

The Company has adopted paragraph 350-30-25-3 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for intangible assets other than goodwill. Under the requirements, the Company amortizes the acquisition costs of intangible assets other than goodwill on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the respective assets as follows:

Estimated Useful Life (Years) Acquired technology 15 Website development costs 5



Upon becoming fully amortized, the related cost and accumulated amortization are removed from the accounts.

Related Parties

The Company follows subtopic 850-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for the identification of related parties and disclosure of related party transactions.

Pursuant to Section 850-10-20 the related parties include a. affiliates of the Company; b. entities for which investments in their equity securities would be required, absent the election of the fair value option under the Fair Value Option Subsection of Section 825-10-15, to be accounted for by the equity method by the investing entity; c. trusts for the benefit of employees, such as pension and profit-sharing trusts that are managed by or under the trusteeship of management; d. principal owners of the Company; e. management of the Company; f. other parties with which the Company may deal if one party controls or can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the other to an extent that one of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests; and g. other parties that can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the transacting parties or that have an ownership interest in one of the transacting parties and can significantly influence the other to an extent that one or more of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests.

The financial statements shall include disclosures of material related party transactions, other than compensation arrangements, expense allowances, and other similar items in the ordinary course of business. However, disclosure of transactions that are eliminated in the preparation of consolidated or combined financial statements is not required in those statements. The disclosures shall include: a. the nature of the relationship(s) involved; b. a description of the transactions, including transactions to which no amounts or nominal amounts were ascribed, for each of the periods for which income statements are presented, and such other information deemed necessary to an understanding of the effects of the transactions on the financial statements; c. the dollar amounts of transactions for each of the periods for which income statements are presented and the effects of any change in the method of establishing the terms from that used in the preceding period; and d. amounts due from or to related parties as of the date of each balance sheet presented and, if not otherwise apparent, the terms and manner of settlement.

Extinguishment Accounting

On July 25, 2013, the Supreme Court of the State of New York, County of New York (the "Court"), entered an order (the "Order") approving the settlement (the "Settlement Agreement") between the Company and Hanover Holdings I, LLC, a New York limited liability company ("Hanover"), Hanover commenced the action against the Company on July 12, 2013 to recover $1,042,000 of past-due accounts payable of the Company, plus fees and costs (the "Claim"). The Settlement Agreement became effective and binding upon the Company and Hanover upon execution of the Order by the Court on July 25, 2013.

The Settlement Agreement provides that the Initial Settlement Shares will be subject to adjustment on the trading day immediately following the Calculation Period to reflect the intention of the parties that the total number of shares of Common Stock to be issued to Hanover pursuant to the Settlement Agreement be based upon a specified discount to the trading volume weighted average price (the "VWAP") of the Common Stock for a specified period of time subsequent to the Court's entry of the Order.

The Company considered the settlement of debt with common shares as an extinguishment of debt and applied extinguishment accounting accordingly. The Company compared the trade accounts payable and related settlement costs with the fair value of common shares issued. Because the fair value of common shares issued was $561,077 greater than trade accounts payable and related settlement costs, the Company applied extinguishment accounting, resulting in a loss on extinguishment of debt of $561,077, for the reporting period ended March 31, 2014.

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Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities

The Company accounts for derivative instruments and hedging activities in accordance with paragraph 815-10-05-4 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification ("Paragraph 815-10-05-4"). Paragraph 815-10-05-4 requires companies to recognize all derivative instruments as either assets or liabilities in the balance sheet at fair value. The accounting for changes in the fair value of a derivative instrument depends upon: (i) whether the derivative has been designated and qualifies as part of a hedging relationship, and (ii) the type of hedging relationship. For those derivative instruments that are designated and qualify as hedging instruments, a company must designate the hedging instrument based upon the exposure being hedged as either a fair value hedge, cash flow hedge or hedge of a net investment in a foreign operation.

Derivative Liability

The Company evaluates its convertible debt, options, warrants or other contracts, if any, to determine if those contracts or embedded components of those contracts qualify as derivatives to be separately accounted for in accordance with paragraph 815-10-05-4 and Section 815-40-25 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. The result of this accounting treatment is that the fair value of the embedded derivative is marked-to-market each balance sheet date and recorded as either an asset or a liability. In the event that the fair value is recorded as a liability, the change in fair value is recorded in the consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive income (loss) as other income or expense. Upon conversion, exercise or cancellation of a derivative instrument, the instrument is marked to fair value at the date of conversion, exercise or cancellation and then that the related fair value is reclassified to equity.

In circumstances where the embedded conversion option in a convertible instrument is required to be bifurcated and there are also other embedded derivative instruments in the convertible instrument that are required to be bifurcated, the bifurcated derivative instruments are accounted for as a single, compound derivative instrument.

The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is re-assessed at the end of each reporting period. Equity instruments that are initially classified as equity that become subject to reclassification are reclassified to liability at the fair value of the instrument on the reclassification date. Derivative instrument liabilities will be classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not net-cash settlement of the derivative instrument is expected within 12 months of the balance sheet date.

The Company adopted Section 815-40-15 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification ("Section 815-40-15") to determine whether an instrument (or an embedded feature) is indexed to the Company's own stock. Section 815-40-15 provides that an entity should use a two-step approach to evaluate whether an equity-linked financial instrument (or embedded feature) is indexed to its own stock, including evaluating the instrument's contingent exercise and settlement provisions. The adoption of Section 815-40-15 has affected the accounting for (i) certain freestanding warrants that contain exercise price adjustment features and (ii) convertible bonds issued by foreign subsidiaries with a strike price denominated in a foreign currency.

The Company marks to market the fair value of the embedded derivative warrants at each balance sheet date and records the change in the fair value of the embedded derivative warrants as other income or expense in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss).

The Company utilizes the Lattice model that values the liability of the derivative warrants based on a probability weighted discounted cash flow model with the assistance of the third party valuation firm. The reason the Company picks the Lattice model is that in many cases there may be multiple embedded features or the features of the bifurcated derivatives may be so complex that a Black-Scholes valuation does not consider all of the terms of the instrument. Therefore, the fair value may not be appropriately captured by simple models. In other words, simple models such as Black-Scholes may not be appropriate in many situations given complex features and terms of conversion option (e.g., combined embedded derivatives). The Lattice model is based on future projections of the various potential outcomes. The features that were analyzed and incorporated into the model included the exercise and full reset features. Based on these

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features, there are two primary events that can occur; the Holder exercises the Warrants or the Warrants are held to expiration. The Lattice model analyzed the underlying economic factors that influenced which of these events would occur, when they were likely to occur, and the specific terms that would be in effect at the time (i.e. stock price, exercise price, volatility, etc.). Projections were then made on the underlying factors which led to potential scenarios. Probabilities were assigned to each scenario based on management projections. This led to a cash flow projection and a probability associated with that cash flow. A discounted weighted average cash flow over the various scenarios was completed to determine the value of the derivative warrants.

Beneficial Conversion Feature

When the Company issues an debt or equity security that is convertible into common stock at a discount from the fair value of the common stock at the date the debt or equity security counterparty is legally committed to purchase such a security (Commitment Date), a beneficial conversion charge is measured and recorded on the Commitment Date for the difference between the fair value of the Company's common stock and the effective conversion price of the debt or equity security. If the intrinsic value of the beneficial conversion feature is greater than the proceeds allocated to the debt or equity security, the amount of the discount assigned to the beneficial conversion feature is limited to the amount of the proceeds allocated to the debt or equity security.

Commitment and Contingencies

The Company follows subtopic 450-20 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to report accounting for contingencies. Certain conditions may exist as of the date the consolidated financial statements are issued, which may result in a loss to the Company but which will only be resolved when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. The Company assesses such contingent liabilities, and such assessment inherently involves an exercise of judgment. In assessing loss contingencies related to legal proceedings that are pending against the Company or unasserted claims that may result in such proceedings, the Company evaluates the perceived merits of any legal proceedings or unasserted claims as well as the perceived merits of the amount of relief sought or expected to be sought therein.

If the assessment of a contingency indicates that it is probable that a material loss has been incurred and the amount of the liability can be estimated, then the estimated liability would be accrued in the Company's consolidated financial statements. If the assessment indicates that a potential material loss contingency is not probable but is reasonably possible, or is probable but cannot be estimated, then the nature of the contingent liability, and an estimate of the range of possible losses, if determinable and material, would be disclosed.

Loss contingencies considered remote are generally not disclosed unless they involve guarantees, in which case the guarantees would be disclosed. Management does not believe, based upon information available at this time, that these matters will have a material adverse effect on the Company's consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows. However, there is no assurance that such matters will not materially and adversely affect the Company's business, financial position, and results of operations or cash flows.

Non-controlling Interest

The Company follows paragraph 810-10-65-1 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to report the non-controlling interests in its majority owned subsidiaries in the consolidated statements of balance sheets within the equity section, separately from the Company's stockholders' equity. Non-controlling interests represents the non-controlling interest holder's proportionate share of the equity of the Company's majority-owned subsidiaries. Non-controlling interest is adjusted for the non-controlling interest holder's proportionate share of the earnings or losses and other comprehensive income (loss) and the non-controlling interest continues to be attributed its share of losses even if that attribution results in a deficit non-controlling interest balance.

Revenue Recognition

The Company follows paragraph 605-10-S99-1 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for revenue recognition. The Company recognizes revenue when it is realized or realizable and earned. The Company considers revenue realized or realizable and earned when all of the following criteria are met: (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (ii) the product has been shipped or the services have been rendered to the customer, (iii) the sales price is fixed or determinable, and (iv) collectability is reasonably assured.

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Shipping and Handling Costs

The Company accounts for shipping and handling fees in accordance with paragraph 605-45-45-19 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. While amounts charged to customers for shipping products are included in revenues, the related costs are classified in cost of goods sold as incurred.

Research and Development

The Company follows paragraph 730-10-25-1 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (formerly Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 2 "Accounting for Research and Development Costs") and paragraph 730-20-25-11 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (formerly Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 68 "Research and Development Arrangements") for research and development costs. Research and development costs are charged to expense as incurred. Research and development costs consist primarily of remuneration for research and development staff, depreciation and maintenance expenses of research and development equipment, material and testing costs for research and development as well as research and development arrangements with unrelated third party research and development institutions.

Non-refundable Advance Payments for Goods or Services to be Used in Future Research and Development Activities

The research and development arrangements usually involve specific research and development projects. Often times, the Company makes non-refundable advances upon signing of these arrangements. The Company adopted paragraph 730-20-25-13 and 730-20-35-1 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (formerly Emerging Issues Task Force Issue No. 07-3 "Accounting for Nonrefundable Advance Payments for Goods or Services to be Used in Future Research and Development Activities") for those non-refundable advances. Non-refundable advance payments for goods or services that will be used or rendered for future research and development activities are deferred and capitalized. Such amounts are recognized as an expense as the related goods are delivered or the related services are performed. The management continues to evaluate whether the Company expect the goods to be delivered or services to be rendered. If the management does not expect the goods to be delivered or services to be rendered, the capitalized advance payment are charged to expense.

Stock-Based Compensation for Obtaining Employee Services

The Company accounts for its stock based compensation in which the Company obtains employee services in share-based payment transactions under the recognition and measurement principles of the fair value recognition provisions of section 718-10-30 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Pursuant to paragraph 718-10-30-6 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, all transactions in which goods or services are the consideration received for the issuance of equity instruments are accounted for based on the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instrument issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The measurement date used to determine the fair value of the equity instrument issued is the earlier of the date on which the performance is complete or the date on which it is probable that performance will occur. If shares of the Company are thinly traded the use of share prices established in the Company's most recent private placement memorandum ("PPM"), or weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.

The fair value of non-derivative option award is estimated on the date of grant using a Black-Scholes option-pricing valuation model. The ranges of assumptions for inputs are as follows:

Expected term of share options and similar instruments: The expected life of

options and similar instruments represents the period of time the option and/or warrant are expected to be outstanding. Pursuant to Paragraph 718-10-50-2(f)(2)(i) of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification the expected term of share options and similar instruments represents the period of time the options and similar instruments are expected to be outstanding taking into consideration of the contractual term of the instruments and employees' expected exercise and post-vesting employment termination behavior into the fair value (or calculated value) of the instruments. Pursuant to paragraph 718-10-S99-1, it may be appropriate to use the simplified method, i.e., expected term = ((vesting term + original contractual term) / 2), if (i) A company does not have sufficient historical exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term due to the limited period of time its equity shares have been publicly traded; (ii) A company significantly changes the terms of its share option grants or the types of employees that receive share option grants such that its historical exercise data may no longer provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term; or (iii) A company has or expects to have significant structural changes in its business such that its historical exercise data may no longer provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term. The Company uses the simplified method to calculate expected term of share options and similar instruments as the company does not have sufficient historical exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term.



Expected volatility of the entity's shares and the method used to estimate

it. Pursuant to ASC Paragraph 718-10-50-2(f)(2)(ii) a thinly-traded or nonpublic entity that uses the calculated value method shall disclose the reasons why it is not practicable for the Company to estimate the expected volatility of its share price, the appropriate industry sector index that it has selected, the reasons for selecting that particular index, and how it has calculated historical volatility using that index. The Company uses the average historical volatility of the comparable companies over the expected contractual life of the share options or similar instruments as its expected volatility. If shares of a company are thinly traded the use of weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as the volatility calculation using daily observations for such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.



Expected annual rate of quarterly dividends. An entity that uses a method that

employs different dividend rates during the contractual term shall disclose the range of expected dividends used and the weighted-average expected dividends. The expected dividend yield is based on the Company's current dividend yield as the best estimate of projected dividend yield for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments.



Risk-free rate(s). An entity that uses a method that employs different

risk-free rates shall disclose the range of risk-free rates used. The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for periods within the expected term of the share options and similar instruments. 47



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The Company's policy is to recognize compensation cost for awards with only service conditions and a graded vesting schedule on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for the entire award.

Equity Instruments Issued to Parties other than Employees for Acquiring Goods or Services

The Company accounts for equity instruments issued to parties other than employees for acquiring goods or services under guidance of Subtopic 505-50 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification ("Subtopic 505-50").

Pursuant to ASC Section 505-50-30, all transactions in which goods or services are the consideration received for the issuance of equity instruments are accounted for based on the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instrument issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The measurement date used to determine the fair value of the equity instrument issued is the earlier of the date on which the performance is complete or the date on which it is probable that performance will occur. If shares of the Company are thinly traded the use of share prices established in the Company's most recent private placement memorandum ("PPM"), or weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.

The fair value of non-derivative option or warrant award is estimated on the date of grant using a Black-Scholes option-pricing valuation model. The ranges of assumptions for inputs are as follows:

Expected term of share options and similar instruments: Pursuant to Paragraph

718-10-50-2 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification the expected term of share options and similar instruments represents the period of time the options and similar instruments are expected to be outstanding taking into consideration of the contractual term of the instruments and holder's expected exercise behavior into the fair value (or calculated value) of the instruments. The Company uses historical data to estimate holder's expected exercise behavior. If the Company is a newly formed corporation or shares of the Company are thinly traded the contractual term of the share options and similar instruments is used as the expected term of share options and similar instruments as the Company does not have sufficient historical exercise data to provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term.



Expected volatility of the entity's shares and the method used to estimate

it. An entity that uses a method that employs different volatilities during the contractual term shall disclose the range of expected volatilities used and the weighted-average expected volatility. A thinly-traded or nonpublic entity that uses the calculated value method shall disclose the reasons why it is not practicable for the Company to estimate the expected volatility of its share price, the appropriate industry sector index that it has selected, the reasons for selecting that particular index, and how it has calculated historical volatility using that index. The Company uses the average historical volatility of the comparable companies over the expected contractual life of the share options or similar instruments as its expected volatility. If shares of a company are thinly traded the use of weekly or monthly price observations would generally be more appropriate than the use of daily price observations as the volatility calculation using daily observations for such shares could be artificially inflated due to a larger spread between the bid and asked quotes and lack of consistent trading in the market.



Expected annual rate of quarterly dividends. An entity that uses a method that

employs different dividend rates during the contractual term shall disclose the range of expected dividends used and the weighted-average expected dividends. The expected dividend yield is based on the Company's current dividend yield as the best estimate of projected dividend yield for periods within the expected contractual life of the option and similar instruments.



Risk-free rate(s). An entity that uses a method that employs different

risk-free rates shall disclose the range of risk-free rates used. The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for periods within the contractual life of the option and similar instruments. 48



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Pursuant to Paragraphs 505-50-25-8, if fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments are issued at the date the grantor and grantee enter into an agreement for goods or services (no specific performance is required by the grantee to retain those equity instruments), then, because of the elimination of any obligation on the part of the counterparty to earn the equity instruments, a measurement date has been reached. A grantor shall recognize the equity instruments when they are issued (in most cases, when the agreement is entered into). Whether the corresponding cost is an immediate expense or a prepaid asset (or whether the debit should be characterized as contra-equity under the requirements of paragraph 505-50-45-1) depends on the specific facts and circumstances. Pursuant to ASC paragraph 505-50-45-1, a grantor may conclude that an asset (other than a note or a receivable) has been received in return for fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments that are issued at the date the grantor and grantee enter into an agreement for goods or services (and no specific performance is required by the grantee in order to retain those equity instruments). Such an asset shall not be displayed as contra-equity by the grantor of the equity instruments. The transferability (or lack thereof) of the equity instruments shall not affect the balance sheet display of the asset. This guidance is limited to transactions in which equity instruments are transferred to other than employees in exchange for goods or services. Section 505-50-30 provides guidance on the determination of the measurement date for transactions that are within the scope of this Subtopic.

Pursuant to Paragraphs 505-50-25-8 and 505-50-25-9, an entity may grant fully vested, non-forfeitable equity instruments that are exercisable by the grantee only after a specified period of time if the terms of the agreement provide for earlier exercisability if the grantee achieves specified performance conditions. Any measured cost of the transaction shall be recognized in the same period(s) and in the same manner as if the entity had paid cash for the goods or services or used cash rebates as a sales discount instead of paying with, or using, the equity instruments. A recognized asset, expense, or sales discount shall not be reversed if a stock option that the counterparty has the right to exercise expires unexercised.

Pursuant to ASC paragraph 505-50-30-S99-1, if the Company receives a right to receive future services in exchange for unvested, forfeitable equity instruments, those equity instruments are treated as unissued for accounting purposes until the future services are received (that is, the instruments are not considered issued until they vest). Consequently, there would be no recognition at the measurement date and no entry should be recorded.

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

In April 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-08, Presentation of Financial Statements (Topic 205) and Property, Plant, and Equipment (Topic 360): Reporting Discontinued Operations and Disclosures of Disposals of Components of an Entity. The amendments in this Update change the requirements for reporting discontinued operations in Subtopic 205-20.

Under the new guidance, a discontinued operation is defined as a disposal of a component or group of components that is disposed of or is classified as held for sale and "represents a strategic shift that has (or will have) a major effect on an entity's operations and financial results." The ASU states that a strategic shift could include a disposal of (i) a major geographical area of operations, (ii) a major line of business, (iii) a major equity method investment, or (iv) other major parts of an entity. Although "major" is not defined, the standard provides examples of when a disposal qualifies as a discontinued operation.

The ASU also requires additional disclosures about discontinued operations that will provide more information about the assets, liabilities, income and expenses of discontinued operations. In addition, the ASU requires disclosure of the pre-tax profit or loss attributable to a disposal of an individually significant component of an entity that does not qualify for discontinued operations presentation in the financial statements.

The ASU is effective for public business entities for annual periods beginning on or after December 15, 2014, and interim periods within those years.

In May 2014, the FASB issued the FASB Accounting Standards Update No. 2014-09 "Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606)" ("ASU 2014-09")

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This guidance amends the existing FASB Accounting Standards Codification, creating a new Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customer. The core principle of the guidance is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

To achieve that core principle, an entity should apply the following steps:

1. Identify the contract(s) with the customer

2. Identify the performance obligations in the contract

3. Determine the transaction price

4. Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract

5. Recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligations

The ASU also provides guidance on disclosures that should be provided to enable financial statement users to understand the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue recognition and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. Qualitative and quantitative information is required about the following:

1. Contracts with customers - including revenue and impairments recognized,

disaggregation of revenue, and information about contract balances and performance obligations (including the transaction price allocated to the remaining performance obligations)



2. Significant judgments and changes in judgments - determining the timing of

satisfaction of performance obligations (over time or at a point in time), and determining the transaction price and amounts allocated to performance obligations



3. Assets recognized from the costs to obtain or fulfill a contract.

ASU 2014-09 is effective for periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period for all public entities. Early application is not permitted.

In June 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-10, Development Stage Entities (Topic 915): Elimination of Certain Financial Reporting Requirements, Including an Amendment to Variable Interest Entities Guidance in Topic 810, Consolidation.

The amendments in this Update remove the definition of a development stage entity from the Master Glossary of the Accounting Standards Codification, thereby removing the financial reporting distinction between development stage entities and other reporting entities from U.S. GAAP. In addition, the amendments eliminate the requirements for development stage entities to (1) present inception-to-date information in the statements of income, cash flows, and shareholder equity, (2) label the financial statements as those of a development stage entity, (3) disclose a description of the development stage activities in which the entity is engaged, and (4) disclose in the first year in which the entity is no longer a development stage entity that in prior years it had been in the development stage.

The amendments also clarify that the guidance in Topic 275, Risks and Uncertainties, is applicable to entities that have not commenced planned principal operations.

Finally, the amendments remove paragraph 810-10-15-16. Paragraph 810-10-15-16 states that a development stage entity does not meet the condition in paragraph 810-10-15-14(a) to be a variable interest entity if (1) the entity can demonstrate that the equity invested in the legal entity is sufficient to permit it to finance the activities that it is currently engaged in and (2) the entity's governing documents and contractual arrangements allow additional equity investments.

The amendments in this Update also eliminate an exception provided to development stage entities in Topic 810, Consolidation, for determining whether an entity is a variable interest entity on the basis of the amount of investment equity that is at risk. The amendments to eliminate that exception simplify U.S. GAAP by reducing avoidable complexity in existing accounting literature and improve the relevance of information provided to financial statement users by requiring the application of the same consolidation guidance by all reporting entities. The elimination of the exception may change the consolidation analysis, consolidation decision, and disclosure requirements for a reporting entity that has an interest in an entity in the development stage.

The amendments related to the elimination of inception-to-date information and the other remaining disclosure requirements of Topic 915 should be applied retrospectively except for the clarification to Topic 275, which shall be applied prospectively. For public business entities, those amendments are effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2014, and interim periods therein.

Early application of each of the amendments is permitted for any annual reporting period or interim period for which the entity's financial statements have not yet been issued (public business entities) or made available for issuance (other entities). Upon adoption, entities will no longer present or disclose any information required by Topic 915.

In June 2014, the FASB issued the FASB Accounting Standards Update No. 2014-12 "Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718) : Accounting for Share-Based Payments When the Terms of an Award Provide That a Performance Target Could Be Achieved after the Requisite Service Period" ("ASU 2014-12").

The amendments clarify the proper method of accounting for share-based payments when the terms of an award provide that a performance target could be achieved after the requisite service period. The Update requires that a performance target that affects vesting and that could be achieved after the requisite service period be treated as a performance condition. The performance target should not be reflected in estimating the grant-date fair value of the award. Compensation cost should be recognized in the period in which it becomes probable that the performance target will be achieved and should represent the compensation cost attributable to the period(s) for which the requisite service has already been rendered.

The amendments in this Update are effective for annual periods and interim periods within those annual periods beginning after December 15, 2015. Earlier adoption is permitted.

Management does not believe that any other recently issued, but not yet effective accounting pronouncements, if adopted, would have a material effect on the accompanying financial statements.

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Going Concern

As reflected in the consolidated financial statements, the Company had an accumulated deficit at March 31, 2014, a net loss and net cash used in operating activities for the reporting period then ended. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern.

The Company is attempting to generate sufficient revenue; however, the Company's cash position may not be sufficient to support its daily operations. While the Company believes in the viability of its strategy to generate sufficient revenue and in its ability to raise additional funds, there can be no assurances to that effect. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent upon its ability to further implement its business plan and generate sufficient revenue and its ability to raise additional funds.

The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.


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