News Column

Researchers Submit Patent Application, "Temperature Sensor and Temperature Probe", for Approval

June 12, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Politics & Government Week -- From Washington, D.C., VerticalNews journalists report that a patent application by the inventors Kieliszek, Martin (Mount Colah, AU); Fiedler, Dirk (Bemboka, AU), filed on March 15, 2013, was made available online on May 29, 2014.

No assignee for this patent application has been made.

News editors obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "Temperature or heat sensors are available for measuring temperature in a variety of circumstances. In one example, a heat sensor can be used to measure the effect that a heat source has when brought into proximity with human skin. Illustratively, the heat source can be an electronic device operating under conditions of normal operation, misuse, or abuse. In this example, heat sensors can be used to analyze the potential burn hazard that the heat source may present to a person.

"One instrument for analyzing potential burn hazard includes a probe with an embedded heat sensor and a temperature regulator. Generally, in use, the temperature regulator is controlled to heat the probe to around the average temperature of human skin, a heat source is brought into proximity or contact with the probe, and the embedded heat sensor is used to measure a temperature increase caused by the heat source. This instrument, which is sometimes referred to as a thermesthesiometer, is used to analyze the potential burn hazard that a heat source may present when brought into proximity with human skin for relatively short exposure times, such as up to about eight seconds.

"It is desired to improve upon prior art arrangements or at least provide one or more useful alternatives."

As a supplement to the background information on this patent application, VerticalNews correspondents also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent application: "The present disclosure improves on existing heat sensing instruments or at least provides a useful alternative by accounting for the role of blood circulation in dissipating heat and regulating temperature in the human body. One example heat sensing instrument of the present disclosure includes a heat sensing probe that is configured to circulate fluid within a body of the probe and near a heat sensing face of the probe to model the flow of blood in the human body.

"Generally, in one example of this heat sensing instrument in use, fluid is circulated through the probe at a temperature and flow-rate close to that of human blood in the body. This fluid flow acts to dissipate excess build-up of heat from the probe face in order to provide an accurate representation of the temperature that a human would experience when a heat source is brought into proximity with the skin.

"These and other aspects of the present disclosure provide a heat sensing instrument that more accurately represents the expected tissue temperatures that human skin is expected to experience when brought into proximity with heat sources for longer exposure times, such as minutes or even hours. Consequently, the heat or temperature sensing instruments disclosed herein can be used to analyze potential burn hazards for longer exposure times. Such a heat sensing instrument can be used to test electronic devices, such as medical prostheses, that are configured to be in contact with human skin for long exposure times in order to establish compliance with safety standards, for example.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

"FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a heat sensor system according to an embodiment.

"FIG. 2 is an isometric view of a heat sensor probe according to an embodiment.

"FIG. 3 is an isometric view of a heat sensor probe according to an embodiment, with portions removed for clarity and including a body of material at a heat sensing face of the probe.

"FIG. 4 is an exploded isometric view of a heat sensor probe according to an embodiment.

"FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of a heat sensor probe taken generally along lines 5-5 of FIG. 2 and including a probe face.

"FIG. 6 is an isometric view of a fluid circulation conduit for use with a heat sensor probe in accordance with an embodiment.

"FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of a heat sensor probe that is similar to FIG. 5, but with portions removed for clarity, and including the fluid circulation conduit of FIG. 6.

"FIGS. 8-10 are isometric views of a heat sensor probe coupled to a support jig in accordance with embodiments.

"FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional view of a heat sensor probe and support jig taken generally along lines 11-11 of FIG. 10.

"FIG. 12 is a flowchart showing a method for measuring temperature."

For additional information on this patent application, see: Kieliszek, Martin; Fiedler, Dirk. Temperature Sensor and Temperature Probe. Filed March 15, 2013 and posted May 29, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=3553&p=72&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140522.PD.&OS=PD/20140522&RS=PD/20140522

Keywords for this news article include: Patents.

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Source: Politics & Government Week


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