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Study Findings on Heavy Metals Are Outlined in Reports from Texas Technical University [Comparison of cytotoxicity and expression of metal regulatory...

July 1, 2014



Study Findings on Heavy Metals Are Outlined in Reports from Texas Technical University [Comparison of cytotoxicity and expression of metal regulatory genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) liver cells exposed to cadmium sulfate, zinc sulfate and ...]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Physics Week -- Current study results on Heavy Metals have been published. According to news reporting originating from Lubbock, Texas, by VerticalNews correspondents, research stated, "Recent advances in the ability to manufacture and manipulate materials at the nanometer scale have led to increased production and use of many types of nanoparticles. Quantum dots (QDs) are small, fluorescent nanoparticles composed of a core of semiconductor material (e.g. cadmium selenide, zinc sulfide) and shells or dopants of other elements."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Texas Technical University, "Particle core composition, size, shell, and surface chemistry have all been found to influence toxicity in cells. The aim of this study was to compare the toxicities of ionic cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) and Cd-and Zn-containing QDs in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL). As expected, Cd(2+) was more toxic than Zn(2+), and the general trend of IC50-24 h values of QDs was determined to be CdTe
According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This implies that ZnS shells reduce QD toxicity attributed to the release of Cd(2+), but do not eliminate toxic effects caused by the nanoparticles themselves."

For more information on this research see: Comparison of cytotoxicity and expression of metal regulatory genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) liver cells exposed to cadmium sulfate, zinc sulfate and quantum dots. Metallomics, 2013;5(10):1411-22. (Royal Society of Chemistry - www.rsc.org/; Metallomics - pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/journalissues/mt)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting S. Tang, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Technical University, Lubbock, TX 79416, United States. Additional authors for this research include V. Allagadda, H. Chibli, J.L. Nadeau and G.D Mayer.

Keywords for this news article include: Texas, Lubbock, Chemicals, Chemistry, Heavy Metals, Nanoparticle, Quantum Dots, United States, Nanotechnology, Cadmium Sulfate, Quantum Physics, Transition Elements, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Physics Week


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