News Column

Researchers Submit Patent Application, "Water Supply Systems", for Approval

July 3, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Politics & Government Week -- From Washington, D.C., VerticalNews journalists report that a patent application by the inventor Landrok, Mads (San Jose, CA), filed on December 9, 2012, was made available online on June 19, 2014.

No assignee for this patent application has been made.

News editors obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "The present invention generally relates to potable water devices and mechanisms, and more particularly to the desalination of large amounts of water at relatively very little expense of energy.

"Large-scale desalination typically requires large amounts of energy and specialized heavy equipment, making it much more costly than fresh water obtained from rivers, ground water, and other natural sources. The areas of the world that lack adequate sources of natural potable water have no other choice than to pay the premiums imposed by large-scale desalination.

"Conventional water desalination techniques for purifying fresh water from seawater include multi-stage flash distillation (MSF) using concurrent heat exchangers, reverse osmosis using pressurized membranes, and vacuum distillation. An interesting system is described (in German) by Hendrik Muller Horst in his PhD dissertation at Technical University of Munich, titled 'Multiple Effect Humidification Dehumidification at Ambient Temperatures'. Such describes using a solar collector to heat seawater which afterwards enters an evaporation chamber to extract a distillate from the subsequent condensation of the generated steam.

"The 'dew point' is the temperature below which water vapor in humid air at a constant barometric pressure will condense out into liquid water droplets. The dew point is a water-to-air saturation temperature and is related to relative humidity (RH). A high relative humidity means the dew point is close to the current air temperature. A relative humidity of 100% means the dew point is equal to the current temperature and that the air cannot absorb any more water, evaporation will stop. If the dew point remains constant and the temperature is increased, the relative humidity measure will decrease.

"At a given temperature independent barometric pressure, the dew point is a consequence of absolute humidity, the mass of water per unit volume of air. If both the temperature and pressure rise, however, the dew point will rise and the relative humidity will lower. Reducing the absolute humidity without changing other variables will bring the dew point back down to its initial value. In the same way, increasing the absolute humidity after a temperature drop brings the dew point back down to its initial level. If the temperature rises in conditions of constant pressure, then the dew point will remain constant but the relative humidity will drop. For this reason, a constant relative humidity (%) with different temperatures implies that when it's hotter, a higher fraction of the air is water vapor than when it's cooler.

"At a given barometric pressure independent of temperature, the dew point indicates the mole fraction of water vapor in the air, or, put differently, determines the specific humidity of the air. If the pressure rises without changing this mole fraction, the dew point will rise accordingly; Reducing the mole fraction, i.e., making the air less humid, would bring the dew point back down to its initial value. In the same way, increasing the mole fraction after a pressure drop brings the relative humidity back up to its initial level. Considering New York (33 ft elevation) and Denver (5,280 ft elevation), [2] for example, this means that if the dew point and temperature in both cities are the same, then the mass of water vapor per cubic meter of air will be the same, but the mole fraction of water vapor in the air will be greater in Denver.

"An eduction distillation system for treating salt water to produce fresh water was described by H. C. Kelley, Jr., in U.S. Pat. No. 3,414,481, issued Dec. 3, 1968. The invention relies on convection and topology for transport, and pulls air up using a wind-wheel (for example) shortly before condensing. Kelley does not use spraying of the input water to assist evaporation. Instead, a hood collector suspended over a covered evaporation bed of semi-heated water is used for better operation. Any wind-wheel at the top as described shortly before the condensation station would likely affect a low pressure point, causing unwanted condensation by the pressure reduction. Any concomitant build-up of pressure right before condensation needs to occur is adverse to the subsequent condensation."

As a supplement to the background information on this patent application, VerticalNews correspondents also obtained the inventor's summary information for this patent application: "Briefly, a water supply system embodiment of the present invention includes a spray evaporation station located at a salt water or other raw water source, and an air conduit to collect natural heat and carry humidified air to a condensation station with a fresh water outlet. Air pressure changes and heating/cooling are induced at various parts of the system to stimulate evaporation and later to provoke condensation.

"These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will no doubt become obvious to those of ordinary skill in the art after having read the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments of the present invention that are illustrated in the various drawing figures.

IN THE DRAWINGS

"FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of water supply system embodiment of the present invention in which an evaporation station is located on the edge of an ocean and the condensation station is located on the dry side of a nearby mountain range;

"FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of closed-loop water supply system embodiment of the present invention in which an evaporation station and a condensation station are collocated on the edge of an ocean. A heat absorbing pipe is looped through a nearby desert to pick up operational heat;

"FIG. 3 a schematic diagram of water supply system embodiment of the present invention that uses differences in the day/night temperatures by the ocean and on land;

"FIG. 4 is a chart representing the humid air temperatures and the dew point along a long connecting pipe run. The temperatures are allowed to fall below the dew point at the condensation station;

"FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of an evaporation station embodiment of the present invention showing details of the evaporation spray nozzles;

"FIG. 6 is a schematic diagram of a transport piping embodiment of the present invention showing details of the system that follow the evaporation spray nozzles at the evaporation station and run to the condensation station;

"FIG. 7 is a schematic diagram of a condensation station embodiment of the present invention showing details of the use of nano-materials before and after the condensation threshold line;

"FIG. 8 is a side view diagram of a spiral conduit embodiment of the present invention;

"FIG. 9 is a perspective view diagram of a spiral conduit embodiment of the present invention; and

"FIG. 10 is a schematic diagram of a stacked pair of spiral conduits in an embodiment of the present invention."

For additional information on this patent application, see: Landrok, Mads. Water Supply Systems. Filed December 9, 2012 and posted June 19, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=6734&p=135&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140612.PD.&OS=PD/20140612&RS=PD/20140612

Keywords for this news article include: Patents.

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Source: Politics & Government Week


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