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Researchers from Queensland University of Technology Report on Findings in Risk Management [Young novice drivers and the risky behaviours of parents...

July 4, 2014



Researchers from Queensland University of Technology Report on Findings in Risk Management [Young novice drivers and the risky behaviours of parents and friends during the Provisional (intermediate) licence phase: A brief report]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Insurance Weekly News -- New research on Risk Management is the subject of a report. According to news reporting originating from Brisbane, Australia, by VerticalNews correspondents, research stated, "While there is research indicating that many factors influence the young novice driver's increased risk of road crash injury during the earliest stages of their independent driving, there is a need to further understand the relationship between the perceived risky driving behaviour of parents and friends and the risky behaviour of drivers with a Provisional (intermediate) licence. As part of a larger research project, 378 drivers aged 17-25 years (M = 18.22, SD = 1.59, 113 males) with a Provisional licence completed an online survey exploring the perceived riskiness of their parents' and friends' driving, and the extent to which they pattern (i.e. base) their driving behaviour on the driving of their parents and friends."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the Queensland University of Technology, "Young drivers who reported patterning their driving on their friends, and who reported they perceived their friends to be risky drivers, reported more risky driving. The risky driving behaviour of young male drivers was associated with the perceived riskiness of their fathers' driving, whilst for female drivers the perceived riskiness of their mothers' driving approached significance. The development and application of countermeasures targeting the risky behaviour of samesex parents appears warranted by the robust research findings. In addition, countermeasures need to encourage young people in general to be non-risky drivers; targeting the negative influence of risky peer groups specifically."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Social norms interventions may minimise the influence of potentially-overestimated riskiness."

For more information on this research see: Young novice drivers and the risky behaviours of parents and friends during the Provisional (intermediate) licence phase: A brief report. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 2014;69():51-55. Accident Analysis and Prevention can be contacted at: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Accident Analysis and Prevention - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/336)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting B. Scott-Parker, Queensland University of Technology, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld 4001, Australia. Additional authors for this research include B. Watson, M.J. King and M.K. Hyde.

Keywords for this news article include: Brisbane, Risk Management, Australia and New Zealand

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Insurance Weekly News


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