News Column

Patent Application Titled "Repositionable Endoluminal Support Structure and Its Applications" Published Online

July 3, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Politics & Government Week -- According to news reporting originating from Washington, D.C., by VerticalNews journalists, a patent application by the inventor WHITE, Jennifer K. (Charlestown, RI), filed on February 11, 2014, was made available online on June 19, 2014.

The assignee for this patent application is Jenesis Surgical, Llc.

Reporters obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "Endoluminal stents can be implanted in a vessel or tract of a patient to help maintain an open lumen. The stents can also be used as a frame to support a prosthetic device or to deliver a therapeutic agent. Stents can be implanted by either an open operative procedure or a closed operative procedure. When an option exists, the less invasive closed procedure is generally preferred because the stent can be guided through a body lumen, such as the femoral artery, to its desired location. Closed procedures typically use one of two techniques.

"One closed procedure employs balloon catheterization where an expandable stent encloses an inflatable balloon. In this procedure, the stent is implanted by inflating the balloon, which causes the stent to expand. The actual positioning of the stent cannot be determined until after the balloon is deflated and, if there is a misplacement of the stent, the process cannot be reversed to reposition the stent.

"The other closed procedure employs a compressed stent enclosed by a removable sheath. In this procedure, a stent made from a shape memory alloy, such as Nitinol, is held in a compressed state by a sheath. The stent is implanted by withdrawing the sheath, causing the stent to expand to its nominal shape. Again, if there is a misplacement of the stent, the process cannot be reversed to reposition the stent.

"Positioning errors are particularly dangerous when the stent is used to support a cardiac valve. Serious complications and patient deaths have occurred due to malpositioning of the valve at the implant site in the body, using the available stent-mounted valves. Malpositioning of the valve has resulted in massive paravalvular leakage, device migration, and coronary artery obstruction. The majority of these complications were unavoidable, but detected at the time of the procedure. However, due to inability to reposition or retrieve the device, these problems were impossible to reverse or mitigate during the procedure."

In addition to obtaining background information on this patent application, VerticalNews editors also obtained the inventor's summary information for this patent application: "An endoluminal support structure or stent in accordance with certain embodiments of the invention solves certain deficiencies found in the prior art. In particular, the support structure can be repositioned within the body lumen or retrieved from the lumen.

"A particular embodiment of the invention includes a support apparatus implantable within a biological lumen. The support apparatus can include a plurality of elongated strut members interlinked by a plurality of swivel joints, wherein the swivel joints can cooperate with the stent members to adjustably define a shaped structure between a compressed orientation and an expanded orientation.

"More particularly, the shaped structure can be one of a cylindrical, a conical, or an hourglass shape. A swivel joint can form a scissor mechanism with a first strut member and a second strut member. Furthermore, the strut members can be arranged as a series of linked scissor mechanisms. The apparatus can further include an actuation mechanism to urge the swivel joints within a range of motion.

"The apparatus can also include a prosthetic valve coupled to the shaped structure.

"Another particular embodiment of the invention can include as medical stem implantable within a biological lumen. The medical stent can include a plurality of elongated strut members, including a first strut member and a second strut member, and a swivel joint connecting the first strut member and the second strut member.

"In particular, the swivel joint can form a scissor mechanism with the first strut member and the second strut member. The swivel joint can bisect the first strut member and the second strut member. The swivel joint can interconnect a first end of the first strut member with a first end of the second strut member.

"The plurality of strut members can be arranged as a series of linked scissor mechanisms. The strut members can also be non-linear. The strut members can be arranged to form one of a cylindrical, a conical, or an hourglass shape.

"The stent can further include an adjustment mechanism to exerting a force to urge the strut members about the swivel joint within a range of motion.

"The stent can include a prosthetic valve coupled to the strut members.

"Specific embodiments of the invention can include prosthetic valves that are rotatable or conventional.

"A rotatable prosthetic valve can include a first structural member coupled to the strut members, a second structural member rotatable relative to the first structural member, and a plurality of pliable valve members connecting the first structural member with the second structural member such that rotation of the second structural member relative to the first structural member can urge the valve members between an open and a closed state. In particular, the rotation of the second structural member can be responsive to the natural flow of a biological fluid.

"A conventional prosthetic, valve can include, a plurality of pliable valve leaflets having commissures at the intersection of two strut members. The prosthetic valve can further include a skirt material coupled to the strut members.

"A particular advantage of a support structure in accordance with embodiments of the invention is that it enables a prosthetic valve to be readily retrieved and repositioned in the body. If following deployment, the valve is mal positioned or deemed dysfunctional, the support structure allows the valve to be readily repositioned and re-deployed at a new implant site, or removed from the body entirely. This feature of the device can prevent serious complications and save lives by enabling the repair of mal-positioned devices in the body.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

"The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following more particular description of particular embodiments of the invention, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which like reference characters refer to the same parts throughout the different views. The drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon illustrating the principles of the invention.

"FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a particular endoluminal support structure.

"FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a four strut section of the stent of FIG. 1.

"FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a compressed support structure of FIG. 1.

"FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the support structure of FIG. 1 in a fully expanded state.

"FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the support structure of FIG. 2 having a particular actuator mechanism.

"FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the support structure of FIG. 2 having another particular actuator mechanism.

"FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a particular support structure and control catheter assembly usable with the actuator mechanisms of FIGS. 5 and 6.

"FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a particular rotating prosthetic valve assembly.

"FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the valve assembly of FIG. 8 while being closed.

"FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the valve assembly of FIG. 8 one completely closed.

"FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the valve of FIGS. 8-10 in combination with the support structure of FIG. 1.

"FIG. 12 is a perspective view of the valve of FIG. 11 in the open position.

"FIG. 13 is a perspective view of a traditional tissue valve mounted to the support structure of FIG. 1.

"FIG. 14 is a perspective view of the valve structure of FIG. 13 having a hill inner skirt.

"FIG. 15 is a perspective view of the valve structure of FIG. 13 having a full outer skirt.

"FIG. 16 is a perspective view of the arrangement of strut members in a conical-shaped support structure configuration.

"FIG. 17 is a perspective view of all hourglass-shaped support structure configuration."

For more information, see this patent application: WHITE, Jennifer K. Repositionable Endoluminal Support Structure and Its Applications. Filed February 11, 2014 and posted June 19, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=1561&p=32&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140612.PD.&OS=PD/20140612&RS=PD/20140612

Keywords for this news article include: Jenesis Surgical Llc.

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Source: Politics & Government Week


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