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New Nanomaterials Study Findings Have Been Reported from University of British Columbia (From cradle-to-grave at the nanoscale: gaps in U.S....

July 2, 2014



New Nanomaterials Study Findings Have Been Reported from University of British Columbia (From cradle-to-grave at the nanoscale: gaps in U.S. regulatory oversight along the nanomaterial life cycle)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Engineering -- Current study results on Nanomaterials have been published. According to news reporting originating in Vancouver, Canada, by VerticalNews journalists, research stated, "Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) promise great benefits for society, yet our knowledge of potential risks and best practices for regulation are still in their infancy. Toward the end of better practices, this paper analyzes U.S. federal environmental, health, and safety (EHS) regulations using a life cycle framework."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of British Columbia, "It evaluates their adequacy as applied to ENMs to identify gaps through which emerging nanomaterials may escape regulation from initial production to end-of-life. High scientific uncertainty, a lack of EHS and product data, inappropriately designed exemptions and thresholds, and limited agency resources are a challenge to both the applicability and adequacy of current regulations. The result is that some forms of engineered nanomaterials may escape federal oversight and rigorous risk review at one or more stages along their life cycle, with the largest gaps occurring at the postmarket stages, and at points of ENM release to the environment."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Oversight can be improved through pending regulatory reforms, increased research and development for the monitoring, control, and analysis of environmental and end-of-life releases, introduction of periodic re-evaluation of ENM risks, and fostering a 'bottom-up' stewardship approach to the responsible management of risks from engineered nanomaterials."

For more information on this research see: From cradle-to-grave at the nanoscale: gaps in U.S. regulatory oversight along the nanomaterial life cycle. Environmental Science & Technology, 2013;47(11):5524-34. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Environmental Science & Technology - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/esthag)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting C.E. Beaudrie, Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, University of British Columbia, Aquatic Ecosystem Research Laboratory, 4th Floor, 2202 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Additional authors for this research include M. Kandlikar and T. Satterfield.

Keywords for this news article include: Canada, Vancouver, Engineering, Nanotechnology, British Columbia, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Journal of Engineering


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