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New Materials Science Study Findings Reported from University of Illinois (Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of...

July 1, 2014



New Materials Science Study Findings Reported from University of Illinois (Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Technology -- Research findings on Materials Science are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting out of Urbana, Illinois, by VerticalNews editors, research stated, "The degradation of hydration products of cement is known to cause changes in the micro- and nano-structure, which ultimately drive thermo-mechanical degradation of cement-based composite materials at elevated temperatures. However, a detailed characterization of these changes is still incomplete."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Illinois, "This paper presents results of an extensive experimental study carried out to investigate micro- and nano-structural changes that occur due to exposure of cement paste to high temperatures. Following heat treatment of cement paste up to 1000 C, damage states were studied by compressive strength test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM image analysis. Using experimental results and research from existing literature, new degradation processes that drive the loss of mechanical properties of cement paste are proposed."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The development of micro-cracks at the interface between unhydrated cement particles and paste matrix, a change in C-S-H nano-structure and shrinkage of C-S-H, are considered as important factors that cause the thermal degradation of cement paste."

For more information on this research see: Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials. Materials Characterization, 2014;92():15-25. Materials Characterization can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Inc, 360 Park Ave South, New York, NY 10010-1710, USA. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Materials Characterization - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/505786)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting S.M. Lim, University of Illinois, Dept. of Civil & Environm Engn, Urbana, IL, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Urbana, Illinois, United States, Materials Science, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Journal of Technology


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