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Studies from Kyoto University Add New Findings in the Area of Cellulose Research (Influence of drying method and precipitated salts on pyrolysis for...

July 1, 2014



Studies from Kyoto University Add New Findings in the Area of Cellulose Research (Influence of drying method and precipitated salts on pyrolysis for nanocelluloses)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- New research on Life Science Research is the subject of a report. According to news reporting out of Kyoto, Japan, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "The influence of bulk density and drying method on pyrolysis behavior was studied by focusing on the salt content within the nanocellulose (NC) materials. The thermogravimetric curves for NC materials were found to be almost identical between the different bulk densities via the various drying methods."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kyoto University, "It was therefore concluded that the bulk density and drying method of NC materials had little influence on pyrolysis behavior. By quantitating the remaining salt content within the sulfate-introduced cellulose nanocrystal materials, we discriminated between the sulfate groups bonded onto cellulose and precipitated sulfate from the solvent. The precipitated sulfate was found to accelerate the pyrolysis of NCs in common with the bonded sulfate groups, but in a different rate."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "These two types of sulfate within the NC materials should have the different catalytic ability on the dehydration of cellulose."

For more information on this research see: Influence of drying method and precipitated salts on pyrolysis for nanocelluloses. Cellulose, 2014;21(3):1631-1639. Cellulose can be contacted at: Springer, Van Godewijckstraat 30, 3311 Gz Dordrecht, Netherlands. (Springer - www.springer.com; Cellulose - www.springerlink.com/content/0969-0239/)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting K. Uetani, Kyoto University, Res Inst Sustainable Humanosphere, Uji, Kyoto 6110011, Japan. Additional authors for this research include Y. Watanabe, K. Abe and H. Yano (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Kyoto, Japan, Life Science Research

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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