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Studies from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) Reveal New Findings on Proteomics (Controlled Protein Embedment onto Au/Ag...

July 1, 2014



Studies from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) Reveal New Findings on Proteomics (Controlled Protein Embedment onto Au/Ag Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Immuno-Labeling of Nanosilver Surface)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Researchers detail new data in Proteomics. According to news reporting originating from Taejon, South Korea, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Difficulties in stable conjugation of biomolecules to nanosilver surfaces have severely limited the use of silver nanostructures in biological applications. Here, we report a facile antibody conjugation onto gold/silver (Au/Ag) core-shell nanoparticles by stable and uniform embedment of an antibody binding protein, protein G, in silver nanoshells."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), "A rigid helical peptide linker with a terminal cysteine residue was fused to protein G. A mixture of the peptide-fused protein G and space-filling free peptide was reacted with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to form a protein G-linked peptide layer on the particle surface. Uniform silver nanoshells were successfully formed on these protein G-AuNPs, while stably embedding protein G-linked peptide layers. Protein G specifically targets the Fc region of an antibody and thus affords properly orientated antibodies on the particle surface. Compared to Au nanoparticles of similar size with randomly adsorbed antibodies, the present immuno-labeled Au/Ag core shell nanoparticles offered nearly 10-fold higher sensitivities for naked-eye detection of surface bound antigens. In addition, small dye molecules that were bonded to the peptide layer on Au nanoparticles exhibited highly enhanced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SEAS) signals upon Ag shell formation."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The present strategy provides a simple but efficient way to conjugate antibodies to nanosilver surfaces, which will greatly facilitate wider use of the superior optical properties of silver nanostructures in biological applications."

For more information on this research see: Controlled Protein Embedment onto Au/Ag Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Immuno-Labeling of Nanosilver Surface. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 2014;6(10):7659-7664. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/aamick)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting I.H. Lee, Korea Adv Inst Sci & Technol, Dept. of Chem, Taejon 305701, South Korea. Additional authors for this research include J.M. Lee and Y. Jung (see also Proteomics).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Antibodies, Taejon, Peptides, Immunology, Nanosilver, Proteomics, South Korea, Nanoparticle, Blood Proteins, Nanostructural, Nanostructures, Nanotechnology, Immunoglobulins, Emerging Technologies

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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