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Studies Conducted at University Medical Center on Immunotherapy Recently Reported (Coinhibitory molecule PD-1 as a potential target for the...

June 30, 2014



Studies Conducted at University Medical Center on Immunotherapy Recently Reported (Coinhibitory molecule PD-1 as a potential target for the immunotherapy of multiple myeloma)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Clinical Trials Week -- Fresh data on Biotechnology are presented in a new report. According to news reporting originating in Hamburg, Germany, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The adaptive immune system is clearly capable of recognizing and attacking malignant plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). However, MM patients evidence severe defects of humoral and cellular immunity, and it is likely that the profound immune dysregulation typical for this malignancy contributes to its eventual escape from natural immune control."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from University Medical Center, "One of the factors responsible for the immune dysfunction in MM might be the programmed death 1 (PD-1) protein. The physiological role of PD-1 is to guarantee T-cell homeostasis by limiting T-cell activation and proliferation. Accordingly, binding of the ligand PD-L1 to PD-1 expressed on the surface of activated T cells delivers an inhibitory signal, reducing cytokine production and proliferation. Using the same mechanism, PD-L1/PD-1 interactions have been shown in a number of animal models to confer tumor escape from immune control. Recently, clinical trials have suggested a significant therapeutic impact of PD-1/PD-L inhibition on a variety of solid tumors-for example, by the application of monoclonal antibodies."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "We show here that based on (1) the broad expression of PD-1 and its ligands in the microenvironment of myeloma, (2) data indicating an important role of the PD-1 pathway in the immune evasion by MM cells and (3) preclinical results providing a strong rationale for therapeutic PD-1/PD-L inhibition in this malignancy, MM may be very well suited for immunotherapy, for example, a monoclonal antibody, targeting PD-1 and/or its ligands."

For more information on this research see: Coinhibitory molecule PD-1 as a potential target for the immunotherapy of multiple myeloma. Leukemia, 2014;28(5):993-1000. Leukemia can be contacted at: Nature Publishing Group, Macmillan Building, 4 Crinan St, London N1 9XW, England. (Nature Publishing Group - www.nature.com/; Leukemia - www.nature.com/leu/)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting D. Atanackovic, Eppendorf University Medical Center, Dept. of Stem Cell Transplantat, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany. Additional authors for this research include T. Luetkens and N. Kroger (see also Biotechnology).

Keywords for this news article include: Biotechnology, Europe, Hamburg, Germany, Oncology, Immunotherapy, Immunomodulation, Multiple Myeloma, Paraproteinemias, Vascular Diseases, Hematologic Diseases, Hemostatic Disorders, Hemorrhagic Disorders, Blood Protein Disorders, Hemic and Lymphatic Diseases

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Clinical Trials Week


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