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Researchers from University of Western Ontario Detail Findings in Bacterial Infections (Characterization of anionic and cationic functionalized...

July 4, 2014



Researchers from University of Western Ontario Detail Findings in Bacterial Infections (Characterization of anionic and cationic functionalized bacterial cellulose nanofibres for controlled release applications)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Fresh data on Bacterial Infections are presented in a new report. According to news reporting originating in London, Canada, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a biocompatible biopolymer synthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus. In this study, BC was oxidized and aminated to produce hydrogels for biomedical applications, and the products were characterized."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of Western Ontario, "A carboxyl (pK(a) of 3.9 +/- A 0.1) content of 1.13 +/- A 0.02 mmol/g was obtained with the TEMPO-catalyzed oxidation. Epichlorohydrin-mediated amination introduced amine groups (pK(a) of 11.0 +/- A 0.1) up to 1.74 +/- A 0.06 mmol/g. The oxidation of BC caused a decrease in its zeta-potential to -103 +/- A 6 mV, and amination increased the zeta-potential to -4 +/- A 6 mV. The fibre diameter decreased after both reactions. The high absolute value of the zeta-potential for oxidized BC led to superior colloidal stability in water, and a 390 % increase in water retention. The oxidized BC hydrogel was also found to increase in water retention fivefold from pH 1 to 7, making it a smart hydrogel."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "The cationic and anionic BC hydrogels described here could be used for several biomedical applications, including self-assembling drug delivery devices."

For more information on this research see: Characterization of anionic and cationic functionalized bacterial cellulose nanofibres for controlled release applications. Cellulose, 2014;21(3):1529-1540. Cellulose can be contacted at: Springer, Van Godewijckstraat 30, 3311 Gz Dordrecht, Netherlands. (Springer - www.springer.com; Cellulose - www.springerlink.com/content/0969-0239/)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting M. Spaic, University of Western Ontario, Dept. of Chem & Biochem Engn, London, ON N6A 5B9, Canada. Additional authors for this research include D.P. Small, J.R. Cook and W.K. Wan (see also Bacterial Infections).

Keywords for this news article include: London, Canada, Ontario, Nanofibre, Nanotechnology, Controlled Release, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America, Bacterial Infections and Mycoses

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Health & Medicine Week


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