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Researchers from La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology Report on Findings in DNA Vaccines (Combination Therapy With an Anti-IL-1 beta...

June 30, 2014



Researchers from La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology Report on Findings in DNA Vaccines (Combination Therapy With an Anti-IL-1 beta Antibody and GAD65 DNA Vaccine Can Reverse Recent-Onset Diabetes in the RIP-GP Mouse Model)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Clinical Trials Week -- Current study results on Biotechnology have been published. According to news reporting from La Jolla, California, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Type 1 diabetes is thought to be an autoimmune condition in which self-reactive T cells attack insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells. As a proinflammatory cytokine produced by beta-cells or macrophages, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) represents a potential therapeutic target in diabetes."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, "We reasoned IL-1 beta blockade could be combined with islet antigen-specific approaches involving GAD of 65 kDa (GAD65)-expressing plasmids, as previously shown in combination therapies (CTs) with anti-CD3. Thus, we investigated whether anti-IL-1 beta antibody alone or combined with GAD65 vaccine could reverse diabetes development in a virus-induced mouse model. Given alone, anti-IL-1 beta had no effect on diabetes, while GAD65 plasmid resulted in 33% disease reversal after a 5-week observation. However, CTs cured 53% of animals and prevented worsening of glycemic control in nonprotected individuals for up to 12 weeks. While the GAD65 vaccine arm of the CT was associated with increased forkhead box p3(+) regulatory T-cell frequency in pancreatic lymph nodes, islet infiltration by CD11b(+/high) cells was less frequent upon CT, and its extent correlated with treatment success or failure. Altogether, our CTs provided prolonged improvement of clinical and immunological features."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Despite unsuccessful clinical trials using anti-IL-1 beta monotherapy, these data hold promise for treatment of type 1 diabetic patients with IL-1 beta blockade combined with antigen-specific vaccines."

For more information on this research see: Combination Therapy With an Anti-IL-1 beta Antibody and GAD65 DNA Vaccine Can Reverse Recent-Onset Diabetes in the RIP-GP Mouse Model. Diabetes, 2014;63(6):2015-2025. Diabetes can be contacted at: Amer Diabetes Assoc, 1701 N Beauregard St, Alexandria, VA 22311-1717, USA. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Diabetes - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/707821)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting P.P. Pagni, La Jolla Inst Allergy & Immunol, Type Diabet Center 1, La Jolla, CA 92037, United States. Additional authors for this research include D. Bresson, T. Rodriguez-Calvo, A.B. Hani, Y. Manenkova, N. Amirian, A. Blaszczak, S. Faton, S. Sachithanantham and M.G. von Herrath (see also Biotechnology).

Keywords for this news article include: Antibodies, Biotechnology, La Jolla, Diabetes, Viral DNA, California, Immunology, DNA Vaccines, United States, Blood Proteins, Immunoglobulins, Synthetic Vaccines, Biological Products, Combination Therapy, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Clinical Trials Week


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