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Researchers at Imperial College Have Reported New Data on Microdialysis (Continuous online microdialysis using microfluidic sensors: dynamic...

July 2, 2014



Researchers at Imperial College Have Reported New Data on Microdialysis (Continuous online microdialysis using microfluidic sensors: dynamic neurometabolic changes during spreading depolarization)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators publish new report on Microdialysis. According to news reporting originating from London, United Kingdom, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Microfluidic glucose biosensors and potassium ion selective electrodes were used in an in vivo study to measure the neurochemical effects of spreading depolarizations (SD), which have been shown to be detrimental to the injured human brain. A microdialysis probe implanted in the cortex of rats was connected to a microfluidic PDMS chip containing the sensors."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Imperial College, "The dialysate was also analyzed using our gold standard, rapid sampling microdialysis (rsMD). The glucose biosensor performance was validated against rsMD with excellent results. The glucose biosensors successfully monitored concentration changes, in response to SD wave induction, in the range of 10-400 ?M with a second time-resolution. The data show that during a SD wave, there is a time delay of 62 24.8 s (n=4) between the onset of the increase in potassium and the decrease in glucose."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This delay can be for the first time demonstrated, thanks to the high-temporal resolution of the microfluidic sensors sampling from a single tissue site (the microdialysis probe), and it indicates that the decrease in glucose is due to the high demand of energy required for repolarization."

For more information on this research see: Continuous online microdialysis using microfluidic sensors: dynamic neurometabolic changes during spreading depolarization. Acs Chemical Neuroscience, 2013;4(5):799-807. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Acs Chemical Neuroscience - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/acncdm)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting M.L. Rogers, Dept. of Bioengineering, Imperial College, London, UK. Additional authors for this research include D. Feuerstein, C.L. Leong, M. Takagaki, X. Niu, R. Graf and M.G Boutelle (see also Microdialysis).

Keywords for this news article include: London, Europe, Biosensing, Microdialysis, United Kingdom, Bioengineering, Microtechnology, Bionanotechnology, Nanobiotechnology.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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