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Reports Summarize Medical Technology Study Results from School of Engineering (An adsorbent monolith device to augment the removal of uraemic toxins...

July 4, 2014



Reports Summarize Medical Technology Study Results from School of Engineering (An adsorbent monolith device to augment the removal of uraemic toxins during haemodialysis)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Health and Medicine. According to news originating from Astana, Kazakhstan, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Adsorbents designed with porosity which allows the removal of protein bound and high molecular weight uraemic toxins may improve the effectiveness of haemodialysis treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A nanoporous activated carbon monolith prototype designed for direct blood contact was first assessed for its capacity to remove albumin bound marker toxins indoxyl sulphate (IS), p-cresyl sulphate (p-CS) and high molecular weight cytokine interleukin-6 in spiked healthy donor studies."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the School of Engineering, "Haemodialysis patient blood samples were then used to measure the presence of these markers in pre- and post-dialysis blood and their removal by adsorbent recirculation of post-dialysis blood samples. Nanopores (20-100 nm) were necessary for marker uraemic toxin removal during in vitro studies."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Limited removal of IS and p-CS occurred during haemodialysis, whereas almost complete removal occurred following perfusion through the carbon monoliths suggesting a key role for such adsorbent therapies in CKD patient care."

For more information on this research see: An adsorbent monolith device to augment the removal of uraemic toxins during haemodialysis. Journal of Materials Science-Materials in Medicine, 2014;25(6):1589-1597. Journal of Materials Science-Materials in Medicine can be contacted at: Springer, Van Godewijckstraat 30, 3311 Gz Dordrecht, Netherlands (see also Health and Medicine).

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from S.R. Sandeman, Nazarbayev Univ, Sch Engn, Astana 010000, Kazakhstan. Additional authors for this research include C.A. Howell, G.J. Phillips, Y.S. Zheng, G. Standen, R. Pletzenauer, A. Davenport, K. Basnayake, O. Boyd, S. Holt and S.V. Mikhalovsky.

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Astana, Kazakhstan, Health and Medicine

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Health & Medicine Week


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