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Reports Outline Glucosidases Study Findings from Changzhou University (Waste Biogas Residue from Cassava Dregs as Carbon Source to Produce...

July 1, 2014



Reports Outline Glucosidases Study Findings from Changzhou University (Waste Biogas Residue from Cassava Dregs as Carbon Source to Produce Galactomyces sp Cczu11-1 Cellulase and its Enzymatic Saccharification)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Current study results on Enzymes and Coenzymes have been published. According to news reporting from Changzhou, People's Republic of China, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "In the conversion of cassava starch dregs to biogas by anaerobic fermentation, the biogas residue (BR) containing lignocellulosic materials still remained in the environment. In order to effectively utilize BR, the complexed 1-methyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethyl phosphate ([Mmim]DMP) media were used for pretreating cellulosic materials."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Changzhou University, "After the optimization of pretreatment, the IL [Mmim]DMP-HCl-water (78.5:1.5:20, w/w/w) pretreament media were used for pretreating BR at 130 A degrees C for 30 min. Furthermore, BR pretreated could be effectively saccharified by cellulase of Galactomyces sp. CCZU11-1. Moreover, BR could be used as a cheap carbon source for the production of Galactomyces sp. CCZU11-1 cellulase. After the culture optimization, the optimal culture conditions were obtained as follows: BR 5 g/L, (NH4)(2)SO4 5 g/L, K2HPO4 2 g/L, MgSO4 0.2 g/L, NaCl 1 g/L, PEG6000 4 g/L, pH 5.5, and culture temperature 30 A degrees C. After the fermentation for 6 days, the FPA and CMCase were 26.2 and 52.8 U/mL, respectively."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Waste BR could be chosen as a promising feedstock for biofuels."

For more information on this research see: Waste Biogas Residue from Cassava Dregs as Carbon Source to Produce Galactomyces sp Cczu11-1 Cellulase and its Enzymatic Saccharification. Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, 2014;173(4):894-903. Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology can be contacted at: Humana Press Inc, 999 Riverview Drive Suite 208, Totowa, NJ 07512, USA. (Springer - www.springer.com; Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology - www.springerlink.com/content/0273-2289/)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y.C. He, Changzhou Univ, Coll Pharmaceut Engn & Life Sci, Biochem Engn Lab, Changzhou 213164, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include L. Gong, F. Liu, T. Lu, Q. Qing, L.Q. Wang, Y. Zhang, F.T. Gao and X. Wang (see also Enzymes and Coenzymes).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Changzhou, Cellulases, Glucosidases, Glycoside Hydrolases, Enzymes and Coenzymes, People's Republic of China

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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