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Reports on Cellulose Research Findings from Federal University Provide New Insights (Self-supported bacterial cellulose polyaniline conducting...

July 1, 2014



Reports on Cellulose Research Findings from Federal University Provide New Insights (Self-supported bacterial cellulose polyaniline conducting membrane as electromagnetic interference shielding material: effect of the oxidizing agent)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Research findings on Life Science Research are discussed in a new report. According to news originating from Florianopolis, Brazil, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Conducting bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes coated with a high proportion of polyaniline (PAni) were prepared through in situ oxidative polymerization of aniline on the surface of the BC in the presence of acetic acid as the protonating agent. The effect of two different oxidizing agents, ammonium persulfate (APS) or iron(III) chloride (FeCl3), on the mechanical performance, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, morphology and ability to absorb the electromagnetic radiation was investigated."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Federal University, "BC/PAni membranes prepared with FeCl3 displayed higher conductivity and better mechanical performance than those observed for pure BC or the BC/PAni membranes prepared with APS. Experiments related to the electromagnetic absorbing properties revealed that BC/PAni membranes prepared with FeCl3 also present improved absorbing properties in the frequency range of 8-12 GHz. The morphology of the membranes, observed by field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy, is strongly affected by the oxidizing agent."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Whereas the BC/PAni membranes prepared with APS present PAni nanoparticles attached on the fiber surface as agglomerates in the form of flakes, those prepared with FeCl3 display a uniform and smooth coating of PAni on the BC fibers as hierarchical mode."

For more information on this research see: Self-supported bacterial cellulose polyaniline conducting membrane as electromagnetic interference shielding material: effect of the oxidizing agent. Cellulose, 2014;21(3):1409-1418. Cellulose can be contacted at: Springer, Van Godewijckstraat 30, 3311 Gz Dordrecht, Netherlands. (Springer - www.springer.com; Cellulose - www.springerlink.com/content/0969-0239/)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from J.A. Marins, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Dept. of Mech Engn, Polymer & Composites Lab, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil. Additional authors for this research include B.G. Soares, M. Fraga, D. Muller and G.M.O. Barra (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Brazil, Florianopolis, South America, Life Science Research

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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