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New Malocclusion Data Have Been Reported by Researchers at University of Pittsburgh (Molecular motor MYO1C, acetyltransferase KAT6B and osteogenetic...

July 4, 2014



New Malocclusion Data Have Been Reported by Researchers at University of Pittsburgh (Molecular motor MYO1C, acetyltransferase KAT6B and osteogenetic transcription factor RUNX2 expression in human masseter muscle contributes to development of ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Data detailed on Dental Diseases and Abnormalities have been presented. According to news originating from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Type I myosins are molecular motors necessary for glucose transport in the cytoplasm and initiation of transcription in the nucleus. Two of these, MYO1H and MYO1C, are paralogs which may be important in the development of malocclusion."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Pittsburgh, "The objective of this study was to investigate their gene expression in the masseter muscle of malocclusion subjects. Two functionally related proteins known to contribute to malocclusion were also investigated: KAT6B (a chromatin remodelling epigenetic enzyme which is activated by MYO1C) and RUNX2 (a transcription factor regulating osteogenesis which is activated by KAT6B). Masseter muscle samples and malocclusion classifications were obtained from orthognathic surgery subjects. Muscle was sectioned and immunostained to determine fibre type properties. RNA was isolated from the remaining sample to determine expression levels for the four genes by TaqMan RT-PCR. Fibre type properties, gene expression quantities and malocclusion classification were compared. There were very significant associations (P

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the role of RUNX2 in adult masseter muscle."

For more information on this research see: Molecular motor MYO1C, acetyltransferase KAT6B and osteogenetic transcription factor RUNX2 expression in human masseter muscle contributes to development of malocclusion. Archives of Oral Biology, 2014;59(6):601-607. Archives of Oral Biology can be contacted at: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Archives of Oral Biology - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/203)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from H. Desh, University of Pittsburgh, Sch Dental Med, Dept. of Oral Biol, Pittsburgh, PA, United States. Additional authors for this research include S.L. Gray, M.J. Horton, G. Raoul, A.M. Rowlerson, J. Ferri, A.R. Vieira and J.J. Sciote (see also Dental Diseases and Abnormalities).

Keywords for this news article include: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Malocclusion, United States, Nanotechnology, Molecular Motors, Acetyltransferase, Emerging Technologies, Enzymes and Coenzymes, Transcription Factors, North and Central America, Dental Diseases and Abnormalities

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Health & Medicine Week


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