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New Findings from Natural History Museum in the Area of Environmental Toxicology Reported (Bilateral renal cortical necrosis with end-stage renal...

July 4, 2014



New Findings from Natural History Museum in the Area of Environmental Toxicology Reported (Bilateral renal cortical necrosis with end-stage renal failure following envenoming by Proatheris superciliaris: A case report)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Ecology, Environment & Conservation -- Investigators publish new report on Environmental Toxicology. According to news reporting originating in Paris, France, by VerticalNews journalists, research stated, "Acute bilateral renal cortical necrosis (BRCN) has been reported following envenoming by exotic venomous snakes. Proatheris superciliaris is a rare viper with restricted distribution in east Africa."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Natural History Museum, "Very little information is available on envenoming by this species. We herein describe the case of a 60-year-old professional wildlife photographer who was bitten on his thumb while photographing an adult specimen of P. superciliaris that he held at home in France. On admission, physical examination revealed severe hypertension and bruising with edema at the bite site. Within the following 24 h, he developed vomiting, diarrhea, acute lumbar pain and anuria. Laboratory tests showed acute kidney injury (serum creatinine 4.6 mg/dL), with thrombocytopenia, anemia and severe coagulopathy. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan revealed hypodense areas in the cortex of both kidneys consistent with diffuse BRCN. As no appropriate antivenom existed, only symptomatic care was given to the patient. Coagulation tests returned to normal within 48 h. The patient was placed on chronic hemodialysis, until he underwent successful kidney transplantation 18 months later. In developed countries, severe complications provoked by snake bites tend to be more frequent with the number of trendy exotic pets. Acute kidney injury, including BRCN, is a classic complication of viper bites. The present case of end-stage renal failure related to diffuse BRCN illustrates the potentially devastating effects of envenoming by P. superciliaris. Clinicians in developed countries should be informed about renal disorders and other potentially fatal complications of venomous snake bites and seek urgent expert advice for optimizing clinical management."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Education and coaching of envenomed patients and exotic snake owners is mandatory to prevent dramatic accidents."

For more information on this research see: Bilateral renal cortical necrosis with end-stage renal failure following envenoming by Proatheris superciliaris: A case report. Toxicon, 2014;84():36-40. Toxicon can be contacted at: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Toxicon - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/259)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting F. Pourreau, Museum Natl Hist Nat, Paris, France. Additional authors for this research include M. Pinsard, M. Goyffon, F. Plasse, E. Desport, A. Thierry, G. Touchard and F. Bridoux.

Keywords for this news article include: Paris, France, Europe, Environmental Toxicology

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Ecology, Environment & Conservation


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