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New Data from Mount Sinai Hospital Illuminate Findings in Gene Therapy (Development of genetically flexible mouse models of sarcoma using RCAS-TVA...

July 3, 2014



New Data from Mount Sinai Hospital Illuminate Findings in Gene Therapy (Development of genetically flexible mouse models of sarcoma using RCAS-TVA mediated gene delivery)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Gene Therapy Weekly -- Investigators discuss new findings in Biotechnology. According to news reporting originating from Toronto, Canada, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal malignancies and unfortunately there are limited functional genomics platforms to assess the molecular pathways contributing to sarcomagenesis. Thus, novel model systems are needed to validate which genes should be targeted for therapeutic intervention."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Mount Sinai Hospital, "We hypothesized that delivery of oncogenes into mouse skeletal muscle using a retroviral (RCAS-TVA) system would result in sarcomagenesis. We also sought to determine if the cell type transformed (mesenchymal progenitors vs. terminally differentiated tissues) would influence sarcoma biology. Cells transduced with RCAS vectors directing the expression of oncoproteins KrasG12D, c-Myc and/or Igf2 were injected into the hindlimbs of mice that expressed the retroviral TVA receptor in neural/mesenchymal progenitors, skeletal/cardiac muscle or ubiquitously (N-tva, AKE and BKE strains respectively). Disrupting the G1 checkpoint CDKN2 (p16/p19-/-) resulted in sarcoma in 30% of p16/p19-/-xN-tva mice with a median latency of 23 weeks (range 8-40 weeks). A similar incidence occurred in p16/p19-/-xBKE mice (32%), however, a shorter median latency (10.4 weeks) was observed. p16/p19-/-xAKE mice also developed sarcomas (24% incidence; median 9 weeks) yet 31% of mice also developed lung sarcomas. Gene-anchored PCR demonstrated retroviral DNA integration in 86% of N-tva, 93% of BKE and 88% of AKE tumors. KrasG12D was the most frequent oncogene isolated. Oncogene delivery by the RCAS-TVA system can generate sarcomas in mice with a defective cell cycle checkpoint. Sarcoma biology differed between the different RCAS models we created, likely due to the cell population being transformed."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This genetically flexible system will be a valuable tool for sarcoma research."

For more information on this research see: Development of genetically flexible mouse models of sarcoma using RCAS-TVA mediated gene delivery. Plos One, 2014;9(4):e94817. (Public Library of Science - www.plos.org; Plos One - www.plosone.org)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting L. Kabaroff, Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Additional authors for this research include A. Gupta, S. Menezes, Y. Babichev, R.C. Kandel, C.J. Swallow, B.C. Dickson and R.A Gladdy (see also Biotechnology).

Keywords for this news article include: Biotechnology, Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Gene Therapy, Bioengineering, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Gene Therapy Weekly


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