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Investigators at Arizona State University Biodesign Institute Zero in on DNA Research (Infrared emitting quantum dots: DNA conjugation and DNA...

July 1, 2014



Investigators at Arizona State University Biodesign Institute Zero in on DNA Research (Infrared emitting quantum dots: DNA conjugation and DNA origami directed self-assembly)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators discuss new findings in DNA Research. According to news reporting originating in Tempe, Arizona, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "QDs that emit in the infrared (IR) range are of special interest at the moment because of their potential as tissue imaging reagents. Due to autofluorescence from tissues, QDs that emit in the visible range fail to produce good signal to noise ratios."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Arizona State University Biodesign Institute, "Here we report the production of Cd(x)Pb(1-x)Te tertiary-alloyed QDs that emit in the 1100-1300 nm wavelength range, capped with the hydrophilic ligands mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) or glutathione (GSH), together with DNA, as specific surface tags. We observed an interesting dependence of the QD emission peaks on the species of capping ligand used. ICP-MS analysis confirmed that changing the identity of the surface ligand in the reaction mixture shifted the elemental composition of the particles and resulted in different Cd/Pb ratios."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Further, DNA directed assembly of the particles onto DNA nanostructures ensures that the particle remains stable in high salt conditions, which is crucial to biological applications."

For more information on this research see: Infrared emitting quantum dots: DNA conjugation and DNA origami directed self-assembly. Nanoscale, 2014;6(9):4486-90. (Royal Society of Chemistry - www.rsc.org/; Nanoscale - pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/journalissues/nr)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A. Samanta, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for Single Molecule Biophysics, Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, 1001 South McAllister Avenue, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5601, United States. Additional authors for this research include Z. Deng and Y. Liu (see also DNA Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Tempe, Arizona, DNA Research, Quantum Dots, United States, Nanotechnology, Quantum Physics, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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