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Findings from University College Cork Update Understanding of Alcohol Oxidoreductases (Direct Electron Transfer of Glucose Oxidase-Boron Doped...

July 2, 2014



Findings from University College Cork Update Understanding of Alcohol Oxidoreductases (Direct Electron Transfer of Glucose Oxidase-Boron Doped Diamond Interface: A New Solution for a Classical Problem)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Researchers detail new data in Enzymes and Coenzymes. According to news reporting originating from Cork, Ireland, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "A planar boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode was treated with KOH and functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to serve as a biosensing platform for biomolecule immobilization with glucose oxidase (GOx) as a test model. The free amino groups of GOx and APTES were cross-linked by glutaraldehyde (X), a bifunctional chemical to form a stable enzyme layer (GOx-X-APTES) on BDD."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from University College Cork, "Micrographs obtained by scanning electron microscopy revealed that a mesoporous structure uniformly covered the BDD surface. Cyclic voltammetry of GOx immobilized showed a pair of well-defined redox peaks in neutral phosphate buffer solution, corresponding to the direct electron transfer of GOx. The apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant of the immobilized GOx was estimated to be 8.85 +/- 0.47 s(-1), considerably higher than the literature reported values. The determination of glucose was carried out by amperometry at -0.40 V, and the developed biosensor showed good reproducibility and stability with a detection limit of 20 mu M. Both ascorbic and uric acids at normal physiological conditions did not provoke any signals. The dynamic range of glucose detection was further extended by covering the enzyme electrode with a thin Nafion layer. The Nafion/GOx-X-APTES/BDD biosensor showed excellent stability, a detection limit of 30 mu M, a linear range between 35 mu M and 8 mM, and a dynamic range up to 14 mM. Such analytical performances were compared favorably with other complicated sensing schemes using nanomaterials, redox polymers, and nanowires."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The APTES-fiinctionalized BDD could be easily extended to immobilize other redox enzymes or proteins of interests."

For more information on this research see: Direct Electron Transfer of Glucose Oxidase-Boron Doped Diamond Interface: A New Solution for a Classical Problem. Analytical Chemistry, 2014;86(10):4910-4918. Analytical Chemistry can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Analytical Chemistry - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/ancham)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y.F. Bai, University College Cork, ABCRF, Cork, Ireland. Additional authors for this research include T.B. Xu, J.H.T. Luong and H.F. Cui (see also Enzymes and Coenzymes).

Keywords for this news article include: Cork, Boron, Europe, Ireland, Biosensing, Bioengineering, Glucose Oxidase, Bionanotechnology, Nanobiotechnology, Enzymes and Coenzymes, Alcohol Oxidoreductases

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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