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Data on Tissue Engineering Reported by Researchers at University of Calgary [The effect of thick fibers and large pores of electrospun...

July 2, 2014



Data on Tissue Engineering Reported by Researchers at University of Calgary [The effect of thick fibers and large pores of electrospun poly(epsilon-caprolactone) vascular grafts on macrophage polarization and arterial regeneration]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- A new study on Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering is now available. According to news reporting out of Calgary, Canada, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "The vascular grafts prepared by electrospinning often have relatively small pores, which limit cell infiltration into the grafts and hinder the regeneration and remodeling of the grafts into neoarteries. To overcome this problem, macroporous electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with thicker fibers (5-6 mu m) and larger pores (similar to 30 mu m) were fabricated in the present study."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Calgary, "In vitro cell culture indicated that macrophages cultured on thicker-fiber scaffolds tended to polarize into the immunomodulatory and tissue remodeling (M2) phenotype, while those cultured on thinner-fiber scaffolds expressed proinflammatory (M1) phenotype. In vivo implantation by replacing rat abdominal aorta was performed and followed up for 7, 14, 28 and 100 d. The results demonstrated that the macroporous grafts markedly enhanced cell infiltration and extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion. All grafts showed satisfactory patency for up to 100 days. At day 100, the endothelium coverage was complete, and the regenerated smooth muscle layer was correctly organized with abundant ECM similar to those in the native arteries. More importantly, the regenerated arteries demonstrated contractile response to adrenaline and acetylcholine-induced relaxation. Analysis of the cellularization process revealed that the thicker-fiber scaffolds induced a large number of M2 macrophages to infiltrate into the graft wall. These macrophages further promoted cellular infiltration and vascularization."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The present study confirmed that the scaffold structure can regulate macrophage phenotype. Our thicker-fiber electrospun PCL vascular grafts could enhance the vascular regeneration and remodeling process by mediating macrophage polarization into M2 phenotype, suggesting that our constructs may be a promising cell-free vascular graft candidate and are worthy for further in vivo evaluation."

For more information on this research see: The effect of thick fibers and large pores of electrospun poly(epsilon-caprolactone) vascular grafts on macrophage polarization and arterial regeneration. Biomaterials, 2014;35(22):5700-5710. Biomaterials can be contacted at: Elsevier Sci Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, Oxon, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Biomaterials - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/30392)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Z.H. Wang, University of Calgary, Fac Med, Libin Cardiovasc Inst Alberta, Dept. of Biochem & Mol Biol, Calgary, AB, Canada. Additional authors for this research include Y. Cui, J.N. Wang, X.H. Yang, Y.F. Wu, K. Wang, X. Gao, D. Li, Y.J. Li, X.L. Zheng, Y. Zhu, D.L. Kong and Q. Zhao (see also Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering).

Keywords for this news article include: Tissue Engineering, Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, Canada, Calgary, Alberta, Immunology, Macrophages, Myeloid Cells, Bioengineering, Connective Tissue Cells, North and Central America, Mononuclear Phagocyte System

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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