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Data on Listeria monocytogenes Discussed by S. Salmieri and Colleagues [Antimicrobial nanocomposite films made of poly(lactic acid)-cellulose...

July 1, 2014



Data on Listeria monocytogenes Discussed by S. Salmieri and Colleagues [Antimicrobial nanocomposite films made of poly(lactic acid)-cellulose nanocrystals (PLA-CNC) in food applications: part A-effect of nisin release on the inactivation of ...]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators discuss new findings in Gram-Positive Bacteria. According to news reporting originating in Vancouver, Canada, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "New bioactive nanocomposite films were prepared by compression molding method for food applications. Film matrix was composed of poly(lactic acid) containing cellulose nanocrystals (PLA-CNC)."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research, "Nanocomposite films were converted to bioactive films using nisin as an antimicrobial agent by an adsorption coating method. Resulting antimicrobial films were then introduced in packages containing sliced cooked ham as a food model and stored for 14 days at 4 A degrees C to determine their inhibiting capacity against Listeria monocytogenes and their physicochemical and structural properties. The study also focused on the nisin release from the films by using an agar diffusion bioassay. It was observed that mechanical properties such as tensile strength, tensile modulus, elongation at break and water vapor permeability values of the bioactive films were stable after 14 days of storage. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis allowed characterizing the adsorption of nisin onto PLA-CNC surface. Microbiological analysis of sliced cooked ham inoculated with L. monocytogenes (3 log CFU/g) allowed determining the potentiality of nisin as a strong antimicrobial agent in PLA-CNC-based films. Bioactive PLA-CNC-nisin films showed a significant reduction of L. monocytogenes in ham from day 1 and a total inhibition from day 3. The percentage of nisin release increased continuously from day 0 to day 14, up to 21 % at day 14."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "These results demonstrated the potential application of PLA-CNC-nisin films on controlling the growth of food pathogens in meat products."

For more information on this research see: Antimicrobial nanocomposite films made of poly(lactic acid)-cellulose nanocrystals (PLA-CNC) in food applications: part A-effect of nisin release on the inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in ham. Cellulose, 2014;21(3):1837-1850. Cellulose can be contacted at: Springer, Van Godewijckstraat 30, 3311 Gz Dordrecht, Netherlands. (Springer - www.springer.com; Cellulose - www.springerlink.com/content/0969-0239/)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting S. Salmieri, FPInnovations, Vancouver, BC V6S 2L9, Canada. Additional authors for this research include F. Islam, R.A. Khan, F.M. Hossain, H.M.M. Ibrahim, C.W. Miao, W.Y. Hamad and M. Lacroix (see also Gram-Positive Bacteria).

Keywords for this news article include: Canada, Vancouver, Bacillales, Nanocrystal, Nanotechnology, British Columbia, Gram-Positive Rods, Emerging Technologies, Gram-Positive Bacteria, Listeria monocytogenes, North and Central America, Regular Gram-Positive Asporogenous Rods

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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