News Column

"Tactical Combat Casualty Care Training System for Hyper-Realistic.Tm. Emergency Medical Training" in Patent Application Approval Process

June 26, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Politics & Government Week -- A patent application by the inventor Segall, Stuart Charles (La Jolla, CA), filed on May 20, 2013, was made available online on June 12, 2014, according to news reporting originating from Washington, D.C., by VerticalNews correspondents.

This patent application has not been assigned to a company or institution.

The following quote was obtained by the news editors from the background information supplied by the inventors: "The United States military spends hundreds of millions of dollars annually training thousands of Savors, Marines, Soldiers, and Airmen for combat operations, while other civilian specialized first responder programs do the same for paramedics and other first responder teams. Because real world accidents, life and death situations, or combat situations are not always an effective or desirable manner to conduct for training events, simulation of events has long been an indispensable training tool.

"Acquisition of expertise in any discipline requires practice. Simulation of combat situations minimizes costs; at the same time simulation provides military personnel and civilian first responders with realistic training scenarios. From armored vehicle and flight simulators to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) mannequins, the United States government conserves many resources by using computers and other training aids to simulate actual operational conditions allowing procedural training in a controlled environment. Simulators of all kinds minimize risk of loss of assets and save on fuel costs, ammunition, and even the lives of the very people being trained.

"Combat medical or first responder teams are groups that benefit greatly from simulation. It is not practical, nor realistic, to expect Corpsmen, Medics, or Paramedics to hone their skills exclusively on real people in real life-threatening situations. Thus, individuals with such responsibilities derive significant training value from implementation of tactics, techniques, and procedures in a realistic, but simulated, operating environment, prior to being faced with a real world scenario. Many systems have been developed to fulfill necessary training requirements by simulation. A wide range of technologies are currently employed, from complex simulation environments that fully recreate an operating room experience, to computer programs and table-top equipment that allow technicians to rehearse medical decision-making and the performance of specific tasks.

"Many of these systems are cost prohibitive due to the level of technology involved in the device. Further, many systems are too big, bulky, or are simply not conducive to mobility or training in the field. Due to the current state of the economy and the fiscally constrained environment within which government agencies continue to work, compact, less expensive, versatile, and realistic training aids are necessary to complete efficient and effective training of medical response personnel.

"In light of the above, it would be advantageous to provide a compact, versatile, and portable injury simulation system that provides a realistic experience to emergency medical teams in a controlled training environment."

In addition to the background information obtained for this patent application, VerticalNews journalists also obtained the inventor's summary information for this patent application: "The Tactical Combat Casualty Care Training System ('TCCC') of the present invention provides a portable and versatile answer to on-the-ground training needs for military Corpsmen and Medics, and civilian first responder teams. The TCCC is comprised of a single Hyper-Realistic.TM. head and upper torso mannequin that allows for practicing at least the following six skill sets: (1) insertion of a Nasopharyngeal Airway ('NPA') for airway management; (2) performing head tilt, chin lift, visual inspection of mouth and physical sweep to remove foreign bodies from the mouth in support of airway management; (3) performing a surgical airway ('cricothyrotomy') for airway management; (4) performing needle chest decompression ('NCD') for tension pneumothorax; (5) insertion of an Intraosseous Infusion ('IO') System into the sternum; and (6) insertion of an IO System into the proximal humerus.

"The TCCC of the present invention includes a tactical combat training device for the purpose of providing an emergency medical services provider hands-on training. The TCCC includes an artificial human skeleton having specific anatomical features which provide the emergency medical service trainee or provider with appropriate tactile response analogous to a real human patient, thereby improving the skills necessary to provide these medical services to human patients.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

"The novel features of this invention, as well as the invention itself, both as to its structure and its operation, will be best understood from the accompanying drawings, taken in conjunction with the accompanying description, in which similar reference characters refer to similar parts, and in which:

"FIG. 1 is a front view of a preferred embodiment of the Tactical Combat Casualty Care Training System ('TCCC') of the present invention, showing the torso construction of the TCCC, with an articulable head, moveable jaw, and cutaway of the skin showing an anatomically correct skeletal construction;

"FIG. 2 is a front view of a preferred embodiment of the internal skeletal components of a preferred embodiment of the TCCC of the present invention showing the anatomically correct interior skeletal components, the location of the intraosseous infusion ('IO') training puck at the sternum, various intercostal spaces between the ribs for needle decompression procedure, and an articulable head, jaw, and neck for medical training procedures;

"FIG. 3 is a side view of the internal skeletal components of the TCCC of FIG. 1, showing the location of a training puck at the proximal humerus for humeral IO training, the various intercostal spaces between the ribs, and an articulable head, jaw, and neck;

"FIG. 4 depicts a back view of the internal skeletal components of the TCCC of FIG. 1, showing the internal skeletal components and the articulable neck vertebrae allowing for motion of the head relative to the torso, facilitating airway cleaning and other medical training procedures;

"FIG. 5 is a front view of a preferred embodiment of the TCCC of FIGS. 1-3 with the exterior features and the skin-like covering resembling a human patient installed, showing the tracheal insertion area sized to receive a trachea training aid;

"FIG. 6 is a front view of the preferred embodiment of FIG. 4, showing a trachea training aid installed in the tracheal insertion area, and the articulable head and jaw, allowing airway cleaning and management procedures and breathing tube insertion for medical training;

"FIG. 7 is a side view of the preferred embodiment of FIG. 4, showing the anatomically correct simulated human torso and head with accurate anatomical landmarks and access to the open mouth and nasal cavity for medical training;

"FIG. 8 is a back view of the preferred embodiment of FIG. 4, showing the anatomically correct simulated human torso with accurate anatomical landmarks on the back for medical training;

"FIG. 9 is a close up front view of the preferred embodiment of FIG. 4, showing the airway hole at the bottom of the tracheal insertion area that connects to the trachea training aid for surgical airway procedures, and the articulable mouth and tongue for medical training;

"FIG. 10 is a diagrammatic view of a of the trachea training aid and the anatomical structure of a portion of a human neck, showing the location of the laryngeal prominence, thyroid cartilage, the cricothyroid membrane, and cricoid cartilage that overly the trachea;

"FIG. 11 is a front view of the preferred embodiment of the TCCC of FIGS. 4-8, showing the neck skin applied to the neck of the TCCC and points of access to airways in the mouth and nasal cavity, depicting the nasal breathing tube partially inserted into the TCCC nasal passage as would be completed during nasotracheal intubation training;

"FIG. 12 is a front view of the preferred embodiment of the TCCC of FIG. 9, showing the nasal breathing tube completely inserted into the left nostril of the TCCC;

"FIG. 13 is a close up front view of the TCCC of FIG. 9, showing the articulable head rotated to the side with the mouth open, allowing a trainee to clear the airway of any simulated foreign bodies during medical procedures training;

"FIG. 14 is a front view of the TCCC of FIG. 9 showing an orotracheal breathing tube inserted in the mouth of the TCCC as would be completed during orotracheal intubation training;

"FIG. 15 is a front view of the TCCC of FIG. 9 showing a trainee's preparation for insertion of a needle and catheter into the chest cavity of the TCCC through an intercostal space, as would be completed during a chest needle decompression procedure of a pneumothorax;

"FIG. 16 is a front view of the preferred embodiment of the TCCC of the previous Figures, showing a needle and catheter inserted into the chest cavity of the TCCC through the intercostal space, as would be completed during a chest needle decompression procedure of a pneumothorax;

"FIG. 17 is a front view of the preferred embodiment of the TCCC of previous Figures, showing a trainee utilizing the anatomically correct features to visually and manually identify anatomical landmarks of the TCCC to allow a correct incision during the establishment of a surgical airway as would be completed during a cricothyrotomy;

"FIG. 18 is a front view of the preferred embodiment of the TCCC of previous embodiments showing the insertion of a manufactured airway through the incision made in the cricothyroid membrane into the trachea as would be conducted during a surgical intubation;

"FIG. 19 is a front view of the preferred embodiment of the TCCC of FIG. 19, showing manufactured airway inserted into the trachea and secured to the neck of the TCCC as would be conducted during a surgical intubation;

"FIG. 20 is a perspective view of the preferred embodiment of the TCCC of previous embodiments showing the use of the anatomically correct features of the TCCC to visually and manually identify anatomical landmarks to facilitate proper sternal interosseous infusion system (IO device) placementon the sternum of the TCCC during training;

"FIG. 21 is a perspective view of the preferred embodiment of the TCCC of previous embodiments showing the application of a sternal IO device to the chest of the TCCC;

"FIG. 22 is a perspective view of the preferred embodiment of the TCCC of previous embodiments showing a catheter that remains in place within the chest of the TCCC, following removal of the sternal IO device;

"FIG. 23 is a perspective view of the preferred embodiment of the TCCC of previous embodiments showing utilization of the anatomically correct features of the TCCC to visually and manually identify anatomical landmarks to facilitate proper humeral IO device placement at the proximal humerus during training; and

"FIG. 24 is a perspective view of the preferred embodiment of the TCCC of FIG. 24 showing a humeral IO device applied to the left shoulder of the TCCC, in addition to the tracheal intubation described in the Figures above."

URL and more information on this patent application, see: Segall, Stuart Charles. Tactical Combat Casualty Care Training System for Hyper-Realistic.Tm. Emergency Medical Training. Filed May 20, 2013 and posted June 12, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=2816&p=57&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140605.PD.&OS=PD/20140605&RS=PD/20140605

Keywords for this news article include: Drugs, Patents, Therapy, Pneumothorax, Cardio Device, Medical Devices, Pleural Diseases, Parenteral Infusions, Intraosseous Infusions, Respiratory Tract Diseases.

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Source: Politics & Government Week


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