News Column

"Sheaths for Medical Devices" in Patent Application Approval Process

June 26, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Politics & Government Week -- A patent application by the inventors TILSON, Alexander Quillin (Burlingame, CA); SCHEEFF, Mark Christopher (San Francisco, CA); DOWNS, Roland J. (Mesa, AZ); ADAMS, Christopher Michael (Tempe, AZ); HOLWEGER, Jon Michael (Queen Creek, AZ), filed on December 20, 2013, was made available online on June 12, 2014, according to news reporting originating from Washington, D.C., by VerticalNews correspondents.

This patent application is assigned to Loma Vista Medical, Inc.

The following quote was obtained by the news editors from the background information supplied by the inventors: "This invention relates to the design and manufacture of high performance sheaths for use in medicine and other applications. These sheaths may be placed over devices intended for the exploration and modification of luminal cavities. The devices may be medical devices used to explore and modify the body.

"Devices used to explore and modify luminal cavities may become contaminated by their surroundings. A medical device used in the body may become contaminated with material from the patient's body. The medical device may be disposed of after use in a single patient. Alternately, the medical device may be cleaned after each procedure.

"Alternately, the medical device may be covered, or partially covered, with a sheath that protects, or partially protects, the medical device from contamination. This sheath may then be disposed of after each procedure. This sheath may be an integral or permanent part of the medical device. The medical device may need some or no cleaning.

"Current sheaths are generally simple, homogenous polymer structures. Because they are made from a single material, they may represent a compromise between all the competing engineering requirements that sheath may have. In many applications, these compromises harm the efficacy, cost, or efficiency of the medical procedure in which the medical device is being used. What is needed is a sheath that can be constructed in such a way as to selectively incorporate whatever properties are required for the application."

In addition to the background information obtained for this patent application, VerticalNews journalists also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent application: "A device is disclosed for therapeutic and/or diagnostic use in or on a patient's body. The device can have a sheath and a tool. The sheath can have a laminate. The laminate can have reinforcement fibers. The sheath can have a sheath length measured from a distal end of sheath to a proximal end of the sheath. The tool can be at least partially within the sheath. The tool can be attached to the sheath.

"The tool can have a first proximal position and a second distal position. The sheath length when the tool is in the first proximal position can be substantially equal to the sheath length when the tool is in the second distal position.

"The sheath can have a reinforcement member. The reinforcement member can be more rigid than the laminate. The reinforcement member can be substantially helical. The reinforcement member can be plastic, metal, any other material disclosed herein, or combinations thereof.

"The tool can be releasably attached to the sheath.

"The device can have a robotic system for therapeutic and/or diagnostic use. The tool can be part of or attached to the robotic system. The sheath can have a fluid tight seal to the tool.

"A further device for therapeutic and/or diagnostic use in or on a patient's body is disclosed. The device can have a sheath and a tool. The sheath can have a laminate having reinforcement fibers. The tool can be at least partially within the sheath. The tool can be fixedly attached to the sheath.

"The tool can have a sheathed tool length measured along the length of tool within the sheath. The tool can have a first proximal position and a second distal position. The sheathed tool length in the first proximal position can be less than about 10% different (i.e., more or less) than the sheathed tool length in the second distal position.

"A method is described for using a tool in or on a patient's body. The method can include attaching a distal end of a fiber-reinforced first sheath to a tool. The tool can be radially within the fiber-reinforced first sheath. The method can include sealing the first sheath to the tool. The sealing can include sealing the distal end of the first sheath to the tool. The method can include deploying the tool to a target site in or on a patient's body for therapy and/or diagnostic use. Deploying the tool can include controlling a robotic system to move the tool.

"The method can include detaching the first sheath from the tool. The method can also include attaching a second sheath to the tool while the first sheath is attached to the tool or after the first sheath is detached and/or removed from the tool.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

"FIG. 1 illustrates a variation of the device.

"FIG. 2 illustrates a variation of the device.

"FIGS. 3A through 3C are variations of cross-section A-A of FIG. 1.

"FIG. 4A illustrates a variation of the device.

"FIGS. 4B through 4D are variations of cross-section B-B of FIG. 4A.

"FIG. 5 illustrates a variation of the device.

"FIG. 6 illustrates a variation of the device.

"FIG. 7 illustrates a variation of the device.

"FIGS. 8 and 9 are variations of cross-section C-C of FIG. 7.

"FIG. 10 illustrates a variation of the device.

"FIG. 11A is a variation of cross-section D-D of FIG. 10.

"FIG. 11B is a close up view of circle E-E of FIG. 11A.

"FIGS. 12A through 12G illustrate variations of a seal.

"FIGS. 13A through 13C are cross-sectional views of a length of variations of the device.

"FIG. 14A illustrates a variation of the device.

"FIG. 14B illustrates a variation of cross section H-H.

"FIG. 14C illustrates a variation of cross section J-J.

"FIGS. 15A through 150 are sectional views through variations of cross section K-K of FIG. 1.

"FIGS. 16 through 18 are tables listing film materials, reinforcement materials, and adhesive and matrix materials, respectively.

"FIG. 19 illustrates a portion of a method that may be used to produce unidirectional fiber tape.

"FIG. 20 illustrates a portion of a method that may be used to produce unidirectional fiber tape.

"FIGS. 21 through 24 illustrate variations of arrangements of unidirectional fiber tape.

"FIG. 25 illustrates a variation of a method for making a laminate.

"FIG. 26 is a graph illustrating a variation of temperature and pressure versus time graph for a method for compacting or curing or melting that can be used with a fiber tape.

"FIG. 27 is a process flow chart of a variation of a process for making a laminate.

"FIGS. 28A through 28H illustrate a method of making fiber tape.

"FIGS. 29 through 32A illustrate a variation of a method for manufacturing the device.

"FIG. 32B illustrates a closeup of circle N-N of FIG. 32A.

"FIGS. 33A through 33G illustrate a variation of a method for manufacturing the device.

"FIG. 34 illustrates a variation of a method for applying fiber to a sheath.

"FIG. 35 illustrates a variation of a method for curing or compacting a sheath.

"FIGS. 36 and 37 illustrate a variation of a medical device.

"FIG. 38A illustrates a variation of a method of using the device with a medical device.

"FIG. 38B illustrates a variation of a cross section Q-Q of FIG. 38A.

"FIG. 38C illustrates a variation of a closeup S-S of FIG. 38B.

"FIG. 38D illustrates a variation of a closeup R-R of FIG. 38B.

"FIG. 38E illustrates a variation of the cross section shown in FIG. 38B in which the articulating section of the medical device is bent at about 90 degrees.

"FIGS. 39A and 39B illustrate a variation of a method of using a variation of the device in the body.

"FIGS. 40A and 40B illustrate a variation of the device.

"FIG. 40C illustrates a variation of a method for placing a variation of a device onto a medical device.

"FIG. 41A illustrates a variation of the device attached to a medical device.

"FIG. 41B illustrates a variation of the device attached to a medical device which is articulated into 90 degree bend.

"FIG. 42 illustrates a variation of the device attached proximal to the articulating section of a medical device.

"FIGS. 43, 44A and 44B illustrate a variation of a method for attaching the device to a medical device.

"FIG. 44C illustrates a variation of a cross-section view T-T of FIG. 44B."

URL and more information on this patent application, see: TILSON, Alexander Quillin; SCHEEFF, Mark Christopher; DOWNS, Roland J.; ADAMS, Christopher Michael; HOLWEGER, Jon Michael. Sheaths for Medical Devices. Filed December 20, 2013 and posted June 12, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=1770&p=36&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140605.PD.&OS=PD/20140605&RS=PD/20140605

Keywords for this news article include: Robotics, Machine Learning, Emerging Technologies, Loma Vista Medical Inc..

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Politics & Government Week


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