News Column

Researchers Submit Patent Application, "Selenium Attachment Agent", for Approval

June 24, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- From Washington, D.C., NewsRx journalists report that a patent application by the inventor Hanes, Robert Eugene (Austin, TX), filed on June 17, 2011, was made available online on June 12, 2014 (see also Selenium, Ltd.).

The patent's assignee is Selenium, Ltd.

News editors obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "For surfaces involving human and industrial use, including but not limited to, indwelling medical devices such as catheters and orthopedic devices are becoming essential to patient care. The benefit derived from these catheters, orthopedic devices, and other types of medical implants, however, is often offset by infectious complications.

"Colonization of bacteria on surfaces, such as the surface of an implant or other parts of the device can produce serious patient problems, including the need to remove and/or replace the implanted device and to vigorously treat secondary infective conditions. A considerable amount of attention and study has been directed toward preventing such colonization by the use of antimicrobial agents, such as antibiotics, bound to the surface of the materials employed in such devices. In such attempts, the objective has been to produce a sufficient bacteriostatic or bactericidal action to prevent colonization.

"Historically, an orthopedic fixation was applied to stabilize fractures and maintain the reduction of a deformity. For example, the earliest fixation methods involved the use of loops of silver wire, which were passed around the spinous process to immobilize the spine in cases of tuberculosis. Later, attempts were made to wire supporting rods made of synthetic material and/or iron to the spine to maintain stabilization. But, because these were ferrous materials, electrolytic reactions occurred, infections developed, and the results were generally unsatisfactory.

"Over the years there has been an evolution to the use of different materials for stabilization, internal splintage and fixation. For example, by the 1930s Venable and Stuck, two orthopedists in Texas, identified that the use of an orthodontic alloy called Vitallium was very suitable in orthopedics. (See, Venable C. S., et al., Ann Surg. 105, 917-938 (1937), the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.) The material was unreactive with the tissues and indeed this stainless steel alloy was the main material for internal fixation and stabilization for the next sixty years. However, because of changing imaging technologies, stainless steel alloys, which produced greater artifacts during the imaging process, have been replaced by other materials, such as titanium. In addition, stainless steel alloys add the complication of a fibrous scar, which encapsulated the device. Titanium, on the other hand, functions more like a ceramic material, in that bone actually grows into the interstices of the crystalline lattice structure of the material producing superior fixation.

"Many implants today are coated in silver, which can be problematic. For instance, the St. Jude Medical Silzone heart valve had been reported to cause chronic inflammatory reaction due to a toxic reaction to silver, leading to the product being withdrawn from the market.

"Another area of concern is infection caused by the introduction of the implant into the patient or the use of an implant in a clinical setting where increased rate of infection in immuno-suppressed patients is prevalent. The treatment of infected implants is quite controversial. There are those who feel that the removal of the implant is the only way to eradicate the infection. However, there are others who feel that the removal of the implant promotes instability, condition. For example, often it is found that the implant becomes problematic because bacteria hide in the interstices of the crystalline structure of the metal or nonmetal implant. This makes the eradication of infection difficult. On the other hand, the clinical challenge is that if the internal stabilizing system is removed, the deformity can recur and stability may be lost, which can effect neurological and vascular function and/or result in a great increase in the patient's pain and discomfort. Moreover, the incidence of chronic infection in the United States is increasing as more and more antibiotic resistant bacteria are spreading through hospitals, extended care facilities and the community.

"As a result, all too often patients have delayed recovery because of infection, implants are removed, and patients are treated with the implant removed. Because of the enormous surgical and clinical complications that can arise from such drastic revision surgery, it is often the case that patients are faced with a less than perfect clinical outcome. It is thus a substantial need in the art to develop compositions and methods that will allow safe and effective treatments of substrates and devices to prevent many of the aforementioned limitations."

As a supplement to the background information on this patent application, NewsRx correspondents also obtained the inventor's summary information for this patent application: "The invention set forth above is described by the embodiments of the invention described herein below:

"The present invention provides a method of binding a selenium attachment agent comprised of a functional end for the attachment to a surface. Said surface could potentially be titanium, or a wide variety of other materials that could be used in medical devices. The selenium attachment agent may further contain a selenium group which can be attached in a variety of methods explored below, the end result being a coating of selenium permanently bound to the surface material, resulting in a biofilm-rejecting solution that is superior to current antimicrobial coatings and compounds used in medical devices.

"This particular aspect of the invention is based upon the finding that inorganic and organic selenium compounds, which catalyze the formation of free radical superoxide ions in the presence of both oxygen and a reducing agent such a reduced thiol group or other electron donor, have biocidal activity when brought into contact with a microbe, such as but not limited to, bacteria, viruses, mold, fungi, protozoan parasites, plant cells, animal cells, biological materials and combinations thereof. These properties make selenium an ideal addition to current medical devices, as its biocidal properties are superior to other options, such as silver, which has been known to cause silver toxicity and deteriorate over time.

"Further, the selenium attachment agent can be combined with functional groups for the promotion or inhibition of the growth of tissues. The process of covalently attaching selenium to either an aliphatic or ether residue, which is then terminated with a variety of methods, resulting in the incorporation into a polymer formulation containing a protecting group which could consist of a variety of useful chemical agents, some of which could promote the growth of tissues, further increasing the successful rate at which medical devices are introduced to the body.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

"FIG. 1 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula illustrating a spacer possessing a rigid framework;

"FIG. 2 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula illustrating a spacer;

"FIG. 3 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of a preparation of deselenide dimethacrylate;

"FIG. 4 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula for the preparation of deselenide dialcohol as monomer in polymerization;

"FIG. 5 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of a general method for coating titanium with an anchor group;

"FIG. 6 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of a general method for coating titanium with an anchor group;

"FIG. 7 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of a selenium attachment agent comprising an anchor group;

"FIG. 8 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of a selenium attachment agent comprising an anchor group;

"FIG. 9 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of a general method for preparing diselenides using dilithium diselenide under organic conditions;

"FIG. 10 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of a general method for the attachment of trialkoxy silanes to activated surfaces or reactive additives;

"FIG. 11 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of a general method for impregnating a medical grade wound dressing with a medical grade polymer made antimicrobial from covalent attachment.

"FIG. 12 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of a preparation of deselenide tetralcohol as monomer in polymerization;

"FIG. 13 the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural of an intermediate tetramesylate used in the preparation of the diselenide tetramine;

"FIG. 14 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of preparation of deseienide tetramine for conjugation to proteins, antibodies or enzymes;

"FIG. 15 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of an activated dicarboxylic diselenide for conjugation to proteins, antibodies or enzymes;

"FIG. 16 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of a monomer in polymerization of for conjugation to proteins, antibodies or enzymes;

"FIG. 16 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of a dimethacrylate for polymerization and is a preferred chemical entity of the present invention to a dimethacrylate;

"FIG. 17 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of a preferred chemical entity of the present invention prepared by an alternate method.

"FIG. 18 of the accompanying drawings is the chemical structural formula of a preferred chemical entity of the present invention."

For additional information on this patent application, see: Hanes, Robert Eugene. Selenium Attachment Agent. Filed June 17, 2011 and posted June 12, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=1831&p=37&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140605.PD.&OS=PD/20140605&RS=PD/20140605

Keywords for this news article include: Antibodies, Titanium, Immunology, Light Metals, Selenium Ltd., Blood Proteins, Immunoglobulins.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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