News Column

Investigators at Changzheng Hospital Detail Findings in Biomaterials

June 26, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Gene Therapy Weekly -- Fresh data on Biomaterials are presented in a new report. According to news originating from Shanghai, People's Republic of China, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The use of poly(propylenimine) (PPI) dendrimers as gene delivery vectors is limited by their low transfection efficacy and serious cytotoxicity. In this study, we prepare a series of efficient and low cytotoxic gene vectors based on PPI dendrimers using a facile fluorination strategy."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Changzheng Hospital, "Fluorinated G3, G4, and G5 PPI dendrimers show comparable or superior transfection efficacies to six representative transfection reagents such as Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI, branched poly(ethyleneimine), SuperFect, PolyFect, as well as arginine-modified dendrimer on both HEK293 and HeLa cells. These fluorinated PPI dendrimers exhibit low cytotoxicity on the transfected cells because they achieve optimal transfection efficacy at extremely low nitrogen to phosphorus (N/P) ratios. In addition, the synthesized materials show high transfection efficacy on 3D multicellular spheroids."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "These results demonstrate that fluorination is a promising strategy to improve the transfection efficacy of PPI dendrimers while reducing the cytotoxicity of these cationic polymers."

For more information on this research see: Fluorinated poly(propylenimine) dendrimers as gene vectors. Biomaterials, 2014;35(20):5407-5413. Biomaterials can be contacted at: Elsevier Sci Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, Oxon, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Biomaterials - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/30392)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from H.M. Liu, Second Military Med Univ, Changzheng Hosp, Dept. of Orthoped Oncol, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include Y. Wang, M.M. Wang, J.R. Xiao and Y.Y. Cheng (see also Biomaterials).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Shanghai, Biomaterials, People's Republic of China

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Gene Therapy Weekly


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