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Patent Issued for Vapor Condenser with Three-Dimensional Folded Structure

June 18, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Electronics Newsweekly -- A patent by the inventors Campbell, Levi A. (Poughkeepsie, NY); Chu, Richard C. (Hopewell Junction, NY); David, Milnes P. (Fishkill, NY); Ellsworth, Jr., Michael J. (Poughkeepsie, NY); Iyengar, Madhusudan K. (Foster City, CA); Schmidt, Roger R. (Poughkeepsie, NY); Simons, Robert E. (Poughkeepsie, NY), filed on March 7, 2013, was published online on June 3, 2014, according to news reporting originating from Alexandria, Virginia, by VerticalNews correspondents.

Patent number 8739406 is assigned to International Business Machines Corporation (Armonk, NY).

The following quote was obtained by the news editors from the background information supplied by the inventors: "As is known, operating electronic components produce heat. This heat should be removed in order to maintain device junction temperatures within desirable limits, with failure to remove heat effectively resulting in increased component temperatures, potentially leading to thermal runaway conditions. Several trends in the electronics industry have combined to increase the importance of thermal management, including heat removal for electronic components, including technologies where thermal management has traditionally been less of a concern, such as CMOS. In particular, the need for faster and more densely packed circuits has had a direct impact on the importance of thermal management. First, power dissipation, and therefore heat production, increases as device operating frequencies increase. Second, increased operating frequencies may be possible at lower device junction temperatures. Further, as more and more devices or components are packed onto a single chip, heat flux (Watts/cm.sup.2) increases, resulting in the need to remove more power from a given size chip or module. These trends have combined to create applications where it is no longer desirable to remove heat from modern devices solely by traditional air cooling methods, such as by using air cooled heat sinks with heat pipes or vapor chambers. Such air cooling techniques are inherently limited in their ability to extract heat from an electronic component with high power density.

"The need to cool current and future high heat load, high heat flux electronic devices therefore mandates the development of aggressive thermal management techniques, using liquid cooling. Various types of liquid coolants provide different cooling capabilities. For example, fluids such as refrigerants or other dielectric liquids (e.g., fluorocarbon liquid) exhibit lower thermal conductivity and specific heat properties compared to liquids such as water or other aqueous fluids. Dielectric liquids have an advantage, however, in that they may be placed in direct physical contact with electronic devices or components and their interconnects without adverse affects, such as corrosion or electrical short circuits. Other cooling liquids, such as water or other aqueous fluids, exhibit superior thermal conductivity and specific heat compared with dielectric fluids. Water-based coolants, however, must be kept from physical contact with electronic devices and interconnects, since corrosion and electrical short circuit problems are otherwise likely to result."

In addition to the background information obtained for this patent, VerticalNews journalists also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent: "In one aspect, a method of fabricating a cooling apparatus is provided which includes fabricating a vapor condenser. Fabricating the vapor condenser comprises: obtaining a three-dimensional folded structure defining, at least in part, a first set of coolant-carrying channels and a second set of vapor condensing channels of the vapor condenser, the first set of coolant-carrying channels being interleaved with and extending parallel to the second set of vapor condensing channels, wherein the three-dimensional folded structure comprises a thermally conductive sheet with multiple folds therein, wherein one side of the thermally conductive sheet comprises a vapor condensing surface, and an opposite side of the thermally conductive sheet comprises a coolant-cooled surface, at least a portion of the coolant-cooled surface at least partially defining the first set of coolant-carrying channels; disposing a first end manifold at a first end of the three-dimensional folded structure and a second end manifold at a second, opposite end of the three-dimensional manifold structure, the first end manifold and the second end manifold comprising openings in fluid communication with the first set of coolant-carrying channels of the three-dimensional folded structure to facilitate flow of coolant through the first set of coolant-carrying channels; and coupling a plate to the coolant-cooled surface side of the thermally conductive sheet with the multiple folds, wherein the plate and the thermally conductive sheet with the multiple folds therein define the first set of coolant-carrying channels of the three-dimensional folded structure.

"Additional features and advantages are realized through the techniques of the present invention. Other embodiments and aspects of the invention are described in detail herein and are considered a part of the claimed invention."

URL and more information on this patent, see: Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth, Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Simons, Robert E.. Vapor Condenser with Three-Dimensional Folded Structure. U.S. Patent Number 8739406, filed March 7, 2013, and published online on June 3, 2014. Patent URL: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=8739406.PN.&OS=PN/8739406RS=PN/8739406

Keywords for this news article include: Electronic Components, International Business Machines Corporation.

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Source: Electronics Newsweekly


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