News Column

Reports from Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery Add New Data to Findings in Tissue Engineering

May 14, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- New research on Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering is the subject of a report. According to news originating from Rome, Italy, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The aim of this study was to investigate whether human tenocytes taken from ruptured quadriceps tendon could be seeded on a biodegradable polycaprolactone-based polyurethanes (PU) urea scaffold. Scaffold colonization and collagen production after different culture periods were analyzed to understand whether tenocytes from ruptured tendons are able to colonize these biodegradable scaffolds."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, "Human primary tenocyte cultures of ruptured quadriceps tendons were seeded on PU scaffolds. After 3, 10 and 15 days of incubation, the samples were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and were examined under white light microscopy. After 15 and 30 days of incubation, samples were examined under transmission electron microscope. Total collagen accumulation was also evaluated after 15, 30 and 45 days of culture. After 15 and 30 days of culture, tenocyte-seeded scaffolds showed cell colonization and cell accumulation around interconnecting micropores. Tenocyte phenotype was variable. Collagen accumulation in seeded scaffolds demonstrated a progressive increase after 15, 30 and 45 days of culture, while control non-seeded scaffolds show no collagen accumulation. These results showed that human tenocytes from ruptured quadriceps tendon can be seeded on polycaprolactone-based PU urea scaffolds and cultured for a long time period (45 days). This study also showed that human tenocytes from ruptured tendons seeded on PU scaffolds are able to penetrate the scaffold showing a progressively higher collagen accumulation after 15, 30 and 45 days of incubation."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This study provides the basis to use this PU biodegradable scaffold in vivo as an augmentation for chronic tendon ruptures and in vitro as a scaffold for tissue engineering construct."

For more information on this research see: Adhesion and collagen production of human tenocytes seeded on degradable poly(urethane urea). Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 2013;21(8):1834-40. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy can be contacted at: Springer, 233 Spring Street, New York, NY 10013, USA. (Springer - www.springer.com; Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - www.springerlink.com/content/0942-2056/)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from L. Ruzzini, Dept. of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Center for Integrated Research, Universita Campus Bio-Medico, Via A Del Portillo, 200, Rome, Italy. Additional authors for this research include U.G. Longo, S. Campi, N. Maffulli, A. Onetti Muda and V. Denaro (see also Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering).

The publisher's contact information for the journal Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy is: Springer, 233 Spring Street, New York, NY 10013, USA.

Keywords for this news article include: Rome, Tissue Engineering, Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, Italy, Europe, Collagen, Urethane, Carbamates, Bioengineering, Extracellular Matrix Proteins.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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