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Researchers Submit Patent Application, "System and Method for Predicting the Viability of a Body Tissue in a Patient, and Measuring Device Used...

June 2, 2014



Researchers Submit Patent Application, "System and Method for Predicting the Viability of a Body Tissue in a Patient, and Measuring Device Used Therein", for Approval

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Gastroenterology Week -- From Washington, D.C., NewsRx journalists report that a patent application by the inventors Cuesta Valentin, Miguel Angel (Amsterdam, NL); Veenhof, Alexander Amold Frederik Adriaan (Amsterdam, NL), filed on July 4, 2012, was made available online on May 22, 2014 (see also Veenhof Medical Devices B.V.).

The patent's assignee is Veenhof Medical Devices B.V.

News editors obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "The discussion below is merely provided for general background information and is not intended to be used as an aid in determining the scope of the claimed subject matter. Aspects of the invention relate to a system and method for predicting the viability of a body tissue in a patient, particularly for use in anastomotic surgery.

"After colorectal surgery, in many patients a new connection between two healthy bowel segments is made, the so-called anastomosis. Anastomotic leakage remains a serious complication following colorectal surgery and its reported prevalence varies widely from 1% to 39%. Not only may this complication result in an acute life-threatening condition, cancer patients show a higher local reoccurrence rate following anastomotic complications with local abscess formation. Anastomotic complications are thought to be related to inadequate perfusion of the anastomosis. Currently, viability of the bowel, before performing the anastomosis, is estimated by the color of the tissue. This remains very subjective and based on the experience of the surgeon.

"Several publications regarding other methods for evaluating bowel viability have recently been reported, such as perfusion by the Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) and oxygenation by the Near-infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS). However, in these publications the perfusion at the site of the anastomosis is measured in an abstract value which can not be compared to the systemic perfusion of the body at the time of surgery."

As a supplement to the background information on this patent application, NewsRx correspondents also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent application: "This Summary and the Abstract herein are provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This Summary and the Abstract are not intended to identify key features or essential features of the claimed subject matter, nor are they intended to be used as an aid in determining the scope of the claimed subject matter. The claimed subject matter is not limited to implementations that solve any or all disadvantages noted in the background.

"In a first aspect, the invention provides a system for predicting the viability of a body tissue in a patient, comprising:

"a computing device,

"a first pressure measuring device for measuring local perfusion pressure in the body tissue of the patient, said measuring device being connected to the computing device,

"a second pressure measuring device for measuring the systemic perfusion pressure of the patient, said perfusion pressure meter being connected to the computing device,

"a display connected to the computing device and adapted to show an index on the basis of the local and systemic perfusion pressures calculated by the computing device, said index being indicative for the viability of the tissue.

"A method of predicting the viability of a tissue in a patient comprises the steps of:

"measuring the local perfusion pressure in a body tissue of a patient,

"measuring the systemic perfusion pressure of the patient,

"feeding the measured values of the perfusion pressures to a computing device, which registers it and calculates an index on the basis of the local and systemic perfusion pressure values,

"displaying the index on the basis of the local and systemic perfusion pressures, said index being indicative for the viability of the tissue.

"By measuring both the local perfusion pressure and the systemic perfusion pressure it is possible to obtain a patient independent index on the basis of which the surgeon can reliably predict tissue viability and therefore be able to take appropriate measures, such as removing the non-viable tissue, to prevent to a large extent anastomotic leakage after surgery.

"In one embodiment the first pressure measuring device comprises a clamp having two clamping members for clamping the tissue there between, a pressing unit for applying pressure on at least one of the clamping members, and a pressure meter for measuring the pressure applied by the pressing unit. Particularly, it may also comprise a perfusion sensor for measuring the perfusion in the tissue at least near the clamp.

"The clamp enables to exert a pressure onto the tissue that influences the perfusion therein. This perfusion can be measured by means of a perfusion sensor, such as a Laser-Doppler sensor or other available sensors. The relationship between applied pressure and perfusion can be registered, and it is for example possible to register the pressure at which the perfusion stops, or at which reperfusion starts. These values may be used as an input in the computing device and the index can be calculated on the basis of one of these values and the value of the systemic perfusion pressure which is measured substantially simultaneously.

"The perfusion sensor may be positioned in one of the clamping members so that perfusion can be measure right at the spot where pressure is exerted, but it would also be possible to measure perfusion just downstream of the pressure spot.

"In a simple embodiment, the pressing unit is a pneumatic pressing unit including a pump. A pneumatic pressing unit is accurate, able to maintain a pressure constant and allows an easy measurement of the pressure. Then, the pressure meter may be a manometer, e.g. integrated in the pump. This is a device that is easy to use and already used in operating rooms.

"If the computing device also includes a controller, for controlling the pump and pressure measuring devices, the measurements may be done automatically, which makes the measurements easier and more reliable.

"The second pressure measuring device may be an arterial line with which the systemic perfusion pressure can be measured continuously. Such device is available in most operating rooms.

"An aspect of the invention also includes a measuring device for measuring the local perfusion pressure in a body tissue of a patient, comprising:

"a clamp having two clamping members for clamping the tissue there between,

"a pressing unit for applying pressure on at least one of the clamping members,

"a pressure meter for measuring the pressure applied by the pressing unit, and

"a perfusion sensor for measuring the perfusion in the tissue at least near the clamp.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

"Further details and advantages of the invention follow from the description below with reference to the drawing showing an embodiment of the invention by way of example.

"FIG. 1 is a scheme of a system for predicting the viability of a body tissue in a patient.

"FIG. 2 is a schematic perspective view of a measuring device for measuring local perfusion pressure which may be used in the system of FIG. 1.

"FIG. 3 is a view corresponding to that of FIG. 2 but wherein the measuring device is partially cut-away.

"FIG. 4 is an exploded view of the measuring device of FIG. 2 without the perfusion sensor."

For additional information on this patent application, see: Cuesta Valentin, Miguel Angel; Veenhof, Alexander Amold Frederik Adriaan. System and Method for Predicting the Viability of a Body Tissue in a Patient, and Measuring Device Used Therein. Filed July 4, 2012 and posted May 22, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=1700&p=34&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140515.PD.&OS=PD/20140515&RS=PD/20140515

Keywords for this news article include: Surgery, Veenhof Medical Devices B.V.

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Source: Gastroenterology Week


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