News Column

Reports Outline Robotics Study Findings from Massachusetts Institute of Technology

May 26, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Robotics & Machine Learning -- Data detailed on Robotics have been presented. According to news originating from Cambridge, Massachusetts, by VerticalNews correspondents, research stated, "In robotic single-port surgery, it is desirable for a manipulator to exhibit the property of variable stiffness. Small-port incisions may require both high flexibility of the manipulator for safety purposes, as well as high structural stiffness for operational precision and high payload capability."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, "This paper presents a new hyperredundant tubular manipulator with a variable neutral-line mechanisms and adjustable stiffness. A unique asymmetric arrangement of the tendons and the links realizes both articulation of the manipulator and continuous stiffness modulation. This asymmetric motion of the manipulator is compensated by a novel actuation mechanism without affecting its structural stiffness. The paper describes the basic mechanics of the variable neutral-line manipulator, and its stiffness characteristics."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Simulation and experimental results verify the performance of the proposed mechanism."

For more information on this research see: A Stiffness-Adjustable Hyperredundant Manipulator Using a Variable Neutral-Line Mechanism for Minimally Invasive Surgery. IEEE Transactions on Robotics, 2014;30(2):382-395. IEEE Transactions on Robotics can be contacted at: Ieee-Inst Electrical Electronics Engineers Inc, 445 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08855-4141, USA. (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers - www.ieee.org/; IEEE Transactions on Robotics - ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/RecentIssue.jsp?punumber=8860)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from Y.J. Kim, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States. Additional authors for this research include S.B. Cheng, S. Kim and K. Iagnemma.

Keywords for this news article include: Surgery, Robotics, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Robotics & Machine Learning


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