News Column

Patent Issued for Optical Pulse Source

May 28, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Electronics Newsweekly -- A patent by the inventors Clowes, John Redvers (Sway, GB); Grudinin, Anatoly Borisovich (Southampton, GB); Godfrey, Ian Michael (Southampton, GB); Vysniauskas, Kestutis (Southampton, GB), filed on March 12, 2013, was published online on May 13, 2014, according to news reporting originating from Alexandria, Virginia, by VerticalNews correspondents.

Patent number 8724215 is assigned to Fianium Ltd. (Southampton, GB).

The following quote was obtained by the news editors from the background information supplied by the inventors: "There are many existing and emerging applications of high power lasers in industrial, medical and scientific processes. Conventionally, solid state and gas lasers, with bulk-optical cavities, are used in these applications, and the outputs of these lasers are generally free space, collimated beams. In most cases, the laser source can be very large, and often constitutes the largest single element of an instrument or machine. In using laser systems in industrial applications, it is often difficult to position the large laser very close to the intended target of the laser beam and therefore bulk-optic beam steering is required. Such beam steering includes specially designed, low loss, high reflective and high-damage threshold minors, mounted and positioned with precision and on a heavy and vibration-isolated surface to enable a robust, reliable performance. In many applications such as semiconductor inspection, the inspection tool is just one of many instruments and machines used within the semiconductor manufacturing process, and space on the manufacturing floor--very often being in an expensive, clean-room environment--costs a premium. Therefore, reduction of the instrumentation footprint is highly beneficial. In other industrial applications, such as laser materials processing, the application environment can very often be noisy, dirty and a challenge to the operation of a laser source. In this application additional measures are often required to protect the laser and beam steering optics from the hostile working environment.

"Fiber delivery of the laser beam is a clear and interesting option, enabling the laser source to be positioned remotely from the target space and enabling a compact optical beam delivery head (optical head) to be installed within the instrument, with the large laser source being positioned, along with any power supplies and cooling systems, outside an instrument and clean room environment. With conventional bulk lasers, fiber delivery involves launching of the laser output beam into an optical fiber. This is very difficult to achieve, especially in high-power laser applications. Most applications require a good beam quality of the laser, which requires a single mode fiber to deliver the beam. In reality, a single mode fiber has a core diameter of less than 15 .mu.m, very often less than 10 .mu.m, and efficient and stable launching of a beam into this aperture is difficult to achieve. Furthermore, in high-power applications, launching of such high intensities into a fiber will damage the fiber facet.

"In addition, applications of UV fiber lasers cannot use a conventional optical fiber to deliver the beam since the UV is absorbed by the fiber. One option that has been considered is to use Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fibers (HCPCF's) in which the light is mostly guided within an air-core of the fiber. The use of HCPCF's does not solve the problem of launching the light into the fiber and avoiding facet damage at high powers. However, HCPCF's have two benefits---they enable the propagation of UV radiation with relatively low loss and also reduced fiber nonlinearity by a factor of approximately 1000 in comparison to conventional glass-guided optical fibers.

"Fiber lasers clearly have a significant advantage over conventional bulk lasers, since the optical beam is already within the fiber and no launching optics are required. Most high-power fiber lasers, particularly in the pulsed lasers, use a Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) configuration, in which the output of a low-power fiber oscillator is amplified in a series of high-power fiber amplifiers. In principle, the output of a fiber laser or fiber amplifier can be delivered directly to the intended target through an output fiber. However, in short pulse applications the nonlinear effects of the fiber and amplifier prevent this. Short optical pulses are generally defined (and defined herein) as pulses having a duration of less than 10 ns (10.sup.-8 seconds). Reduction of fiber nonlinearity is a major challenge in any fiber-based system, particularly when short pulses are required at relatively high peak intensities.

"In cw and long pulse applications, there is little issue with the use of additional lengths of fiber at the amplifier output, since nonlinear effects can often be neglected owing to relatively low peak powers. However, for short-pulse fiber delivery, the nonlinear effects within an optical fiber prevent the delivery of high power pulses due to degradation of the pulses' temporal and spectral characteristics due to high order nonlinear effects such as self-phase modulation, which causes spectral broadening, and Raman scattering, which causes both spectral and temporal broadening.

"HCPCF's and conventional optical fibers with larger core sizes (referred to as large-mode-area (LMA) fibers) have been used to reduce fiber nonlinearity. HCPCF's reduce the nonlinearity by several orders of magnitude, where LMA fibers reduce the nonlinearity, scaling with the area of the core. However, the use of LMA fibers for beam delivery in high-power pulsed applications is not a solution since even the largest single-mode core fiber (of 15-20 .mu.m), results in significant nonlinear effects when high-peak power pulses are delivered.

"The importance of reducing nonlinear effects can be illustrated by considering UV to generation from a short-pulse source. The use of short pulses to generate visible and UV radiation is a common approach, since the high peak powers attainable from short pulses provide efficient frequency conversion in nonlinear materials such as lithium triborate (LBO) and .beta.-barium borate (BBO). However, efficient conversion within conventional nonlinear media often requires that the spectral bandwidth of the pulse is as narrow as possible--preferably with the pulses transform limited. Any high order nonlinearity within a delivery fiber or a fiber amplifier will result in spectral broadening; a relatively low nonlinearity will double the spectral bandwidth of a pulse and hence significantly reduce the conversion efficiency of that pulse. It is therefore important in all stages of amplification of the pulse to avoid or reduce fiber nonlinear effects.

"For amplifying short optical pulses, it is possible to use Chirped Pulse Amplification (CPA), a technique developed for bulk-laser systems, in which a short pulse from an oscillator is stretched in a fiber or bulk optic stretcher, amplified and then compressed. In this instance, the amplified, long pulses can also be delivered by an optical fiber to a remote probe where they are subsequently re-compressed, as described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,249,630.

"One of the main problems with the CPA approach is that, in order to amplify pulses without significant nonlinear distortion, the pulse must be stretched to a duration of typically greater than 10 ns. Therefore, to compress the stretched amplified pulse, a fairly long and complex compressor is required. Furthermore, in stretching and compressing the pulse, bulk optic components are typically required, preventing an all-fiber approach. This is difficult to make robust and involves significant loss which necessitates another stage of amplification in the MOPA. Furthermore, after amplification and fiber delivery, the compression stage also involves significant optical loss and, due to the relatively long pulse duration, the compressor itself is very large, meaning that the optical head itself has a large footprint. In general, the approach of CPA is not ideal and is also difficult to maintain in a compact, robust and lightweight form especially in a harsh operating environment."

In addition to the background information obtained for this patent, VerticalNews journalists also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent: "According to an aspect of the present invention there is provided a high power short optical pulse source comprising:

"an optical signal source operable to output short optical pulses;

"an optical pump light source provided at a first location;

"an optical head provided at a second location remote from the first location;

"high power optical fiber amplifier means having at least its optical output located within the optical head;

"an optical signal delivery fiber arranged to deliver optical pulses from the optical signal source to the high power optical fiber amplifier means; and

"a pump light delivery fiber arranged to deliver optical pump light to the high power optical fiber amplifier means,

"wherein short optical pulses of a first optical power are delivered to the high power optical fiber amplifier means and are amplified therein to a second, high optical power for output from the optical head.

"The optical signal source preferably comprises a master oscillator optically coupled to an optical fiber preamplifier, comprising a preamplifier amplifier optical fiber and one or more preamplifier optical pump sources. The preamplifier amplifier optical fiber preferably comprises a rare-earth doped optical fiber. The optical signal source is preferably provided at the first location. Alternatively, the master oscillator and the preamplifier amplifier optical fiber may be provided at a third location, intermediate the first and second locations, with the or each preamplifier optical pump source being provided at the first location and being coupled to the preamplifier amplifier optical fiber via a corresponding one or more preamplifier pump delivery fibers.

"A plurality of optical pump light sources may be provided at the first location and a corresponding plurality of pump light delivery fibers.

"The high power optical fiber amplifier means preferably comprises an amplifier optical fiber and one or more pump signal combiners. The amplifier optical fiber preferably comprises a rare-earth doped optical fiber, and is most preferably of the same type of rare-earth doped optical fiber as the preamplifier amplifier optical fiber.

"The high power short optical pulse source may comprise a plurality of high power optical fiber amplifier means optically coupled in series, at least the optical output of the final high power optical fiber amplifier means being located within the optical head.

"The or each amplifier optical fiber is preferably located within the optical head. The or each pump signal combiner may be located within the optical head. The or each pump signal combiner may alternatively be located at the first location, with the high power optical fiber amplifier means additionally comprising a pump signal delivery fiber optically coupled between the or each pump signal combiner and the or each amplifier optical fiber. The or each pump signal delivery fiber is preferably a double-clad optical fiber and is most preferably a polarisation maintaining optical fiber.

"Alternatively, the amplifier optical fiber may be arranged to extend from the first location to the optical head. The amplifier optical fiber preferably comprises a double-clad amplifier optical fiber. The or a pump signal combiner may be provided at the first location, arranged to couple optical pulses and pump light into one end of the amplifier optical fiber. Alternatively or additionally, the or a pump signal combiner may be provided within the optical head, arranged to couple pump light into the signal output end of the amplifier optical fiber.

"The optical head preferably further comprises an optical isolator and optical collimator assembly optically coupled to the output of the high power optical fiber amplifier means.

"The high power optical fiber amplifier means may further comprise a bulk optic amplifier element, most preferably a rod amplifier, optically coupled to the output end of the or the final amplifier optical fiber, said amplifier optical fiber being under-length such that a proportion of any pump light coupled into said amplifier optical fiber is unabsorbed by it, and serves to pump the bulk optic amplifier element.

"The high power short optical pulse source may further comprise nonlinear optical frequency conversion means optically coupled to the output of the or the final high power optical fiber amplifier means. The nonlinear optical frequency conversion means preferably comprises a nonlinear optical crystal. The nonlinear optical frequency conversion means may comprise a plurality of nonlinear optical crystals arranged optically in series. The nonlinear optical frequency conversion means may alternatively comprise a nonlinear optical fiber.

"The high power short optical pulse source may alternatively or additionally comprise an optical pulse compressor optically coupled to the output of the or the final high power optical fiber amplifier means or the nonlinear optical frequency conversion means. The optical pulse compressor may comprise a transmission grating pair or photonic crystal fiber having anomalous dispersion at the signal wavelength.

"The high power short optical pulse source may further comprise a pulse picker operable to reduce the optical pulse frequency. The pulse picker preferably comprises an optical gate, such as an acousto-optic modulator, driven at a synchronised gating frequency lower than the optical pulse frequency output from the optical signal source.

"The high power short optical pulse source may further comprise optical monitoring means within the optical head.

"The optical head may be movably mounted to enable accurate direction of generated high power short optical pulses onto a target or specimen under test. The optical head is preferably mounted on a translation stage or a mechanical manipulator, such as a robotic arm."

URL and more information on this patent, see: Clowes, John Redvers; Grudinin, Anatoly Borisovich; Godfrey, Ian Michael; Vysniauskas, Kestutis. Optical Pulse Source. U.S. Patent Number 8724215, filed March 12, 2013, and published online on May 13, 2014. Patent URL: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=55&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=2729&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=PTXT&s1=20140513.PD.&OS=ISD/20140513&RS=ISD/20140513

Keywords for this news article include: Electronics, Fianium Ltd., Semiconductor.

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Source: Electronics Newsweekly